Earth is the Hackerspaces Planet

October 06, 2017

NYC Resistor

Soldering class tomorrow, Oct 7

We still have room left in tomorrow’s Intro to Soldering class! 

In this hands-on workshop, you’ll learn how to use a soldering iron safely and effectively, and get plenty of practice with both soldering and desoldering techniques. We’ll be soldering up some Game of Life kits – LED tiles that generate nifty animations.

Tickets available here.

by Bonnie Eisenman at October 06, 2017 05:19 PM

October 05, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Locktoberfest 2017!

 

Locktoberfest is a party! First things first, we’re here to have fun. What’s fun for us? Lockpicking! Also: brats and…. you! Locktoberfest is open to everyone, from world class lockpickers to those interested in learning for the first time.

Locktoberfest is a day of learningteaching, and competitions (serious and frivolous) related to lockpicking.

The Chicago chapter of TOOOL has been getting together to play with locks for a while now and we decided that “October” is just as good an excuse for a party as any. Come on out and join us on Saturday 14th October 2017 from 1PM to 8 PM at PS:One.

The event is BYOB and BYOF, but I heard there will be some brats and pickles.

Please help us know the head-count and register here: Registration

The post Locktoberfest 2017! appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by SiteOwner at October 05, 2017 03:21 PM

October 04, 2017

NYC Resistor

Halloween and 10th Anniversary Party


We’ve got a lot to celebrate! It’s NYC Resistor’s 10th anniversary and it’s Halloween.

We’re having a party October 28th at 8:00p!

NYC Resistor was formed in 2007. In the past 10 years we’ve grown and evolved, both as a group and physical space. Come find out what we’re all about and raise a glass to new and old friends!

By popular demand, DJ Smokey returns to NYCR with a fresh and spooky set of hand-mixed beats, and this time he’s bringing along his visual effects team, Interlock Ness Monster, to perform a laser lightshow and more.

We’re having a costume contest! Wear your best costumes and bring your best props.
(It’s also ok if you’re shy and don’t want to wear one)
21+, tickets are only $8 in advance, $10 at the door. Includes free drinks (soda, water, beer, wine, liquor) and snacks.

by Sophi Kravitz at October 04, 2017 03:34 PM

October 01, 2017

NYC Resistor

Soldering Party for Great (Social) Justice with HeatSeek, Thursday Oct 5, 6-9pm

Learn to solder and help Heat Seek assemble devices to track the heat in apartments and keep landlords honest! Sign up here

We need your help to solder and assemble 25 of HeatSeek’s latest temperature-logging devices. This is a simple through-hole soldering project and a good place for beginners to start and we’re happy to teach you how to solder, but we’d also LOVE help from a few experienced folks who can guide others or zip through a few devices even faster!

Heat Seek‘s mission is make the city a safer, warmer place to live for all New Yorkers. Heat Seek helps tenants resolve their home heating issues by providing the objective, reliable temperature data they need to hold their landlords accountable. Working closely with tenant organizers, public interest attorneys, and city officials, HeatSeek installs proprietary temperature sensors and offers technical expertise to assist low-income tenants in documenting when their landlords fail to provide adequate heat during the wintertime. By focusing on tenants at risk being forced from rent-stabilized and other affordable housing, Heat Seek ensures that sensors are placed with the tenants who need their data the most.

If you’re able to come help, please sign up so we know how many helpers to plan for!

by Eric Skiff at October 01, 2017 02:59 AM

September 18, 2017

Baltimore Node

Baltimore Node 8th Anniversary Party!

You’re invited!

Please join us in celebrating our eighth year of being us! We’ve worked hard to bring our space together to create a supportive and collaborative environment in Baltimore city where people can hack, make, craft, and create art and tech projects. Come by the Node on Sunday, October 22nd, 2017 for our 8 year anniversary party!

Join us for games, food, music, and show and tell. Relax with friends, meet new ones, and talk about what you like to make. Have a project you’ve made in the last 8 years? Bring it by and set it up somewhere to show it to others!

Where at?

Baltimore Node
2106 N Lovegrove Street
Baltimore, MD. 21218

When?

12-5 PM Tabletop/Board games & Open house
3-5PM Laser cutting and 3D printing demo
2-5PM Show and Tell
6-7PM Metal casting demo
5-9PM Food! Music!

Food?

We’ll be firing up the grill in the late afternoon to have a cookout. We’ll probably light it with a flame thrower. We’re also running this as a potluck, so here’s your chance to show us what you’ve got! Cook something and bring it along, or pick up something.

Please add what you’re contributing to our google doc linked below:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1993aE8Oqzmtdm6ldvFNbkSpump4xWGAIhfLA4z03ax0/

Music!

Did you know our landlord repairs player pianos? If we’re nice, he’ll probably turn one of them on for us to enjoy. There’s also some speakers in the space hooked to an aux cable/Chromecast.

RSVP!

Let us know you’re coming by RSVPing here on Meetup. We’ve got a Facebook event up too. Bring a friend too if you’d like.

Who are we?

The Baltimore Node is a 501(c)(3) member-run nonprofit that organizes a space where people can hack, craft, and make interesting things in a supportive and collaborative environment. Membership dues are typically $50 per month and provide a member with 24/7 access to tools, the space, a key, a vote, and the ability to run workshops. Learn more at Baltimorenode.org

We look forward to seeing you there! After all, you only get to host an anniversary party once a year.

Thanks,

Todd Blatt

by Todd Blatt at September 18, 2017 07:51 PM

September 13, 2017

NYC Resistor

2017 Group Portraits

The Future of Resistor meeting. Photo by Billie Ward, licensed CC-BY

Photo by Becky Stern

by Becky Stern at September 13, 2017 04:03 PM

Giant D20: I made my favorite theatre director cry…

One of the things I got hooked on when moving to New York City is the improv theatre show sequence The Campaign — a troupe plays out a D&D-style dungeon-crawling campaign on stage.

On a whim, I decided that I really should give them a Christmas gift, and realized that I had a pile of red mirror-acrylic scraps sitting around. After looking around for giant D20s, I decided to simply build my own to give them.

Cutting the acrylic into 20 equilateral triangles is easy enough on the laser cutter, and etching out numbers is (at least in theory) also perfectly decent. I was being cheap about it, though, and cut out outlines with the laser, going at the interior of each digit by pretending a power drill was a router (encouraged by Widget! It wasn’t my idea!) all the way until I made my drill bit snap into pieces.

The plan was to illuminate the D20 from the inside, and make it pulse or blink on a critical hit or critical miss (ie 20 or 1). Since 20 and 1 are opposite sides, this amounts to checking whether either of the sides is horizontal. An easy solution here would have been to put in an Arduino and a sensor — so clearly that’s not something I did. Instead, I realized that (in theory), a circle of tilt sensors should detect flat orientation. 
With a ring of switches, any one of which closes if it tilts more than ~30º from horizontal, the entire thing conducts electricity whenever it is tilted, and breaks the connection whenever it is flat.

So putting one of these on either the 1- or the 20-face should get us a circuit that detects crits. Pulsing is easy enough with a simple oscillator, and I got some help putting together an Astable Multivibrator — a square wave generator — out of transistors, capacitors and resistors.

I ordered myself some ball tilt switches — metal tubes with a tiny steel ball inside, and connectors, one to a metal pin inside, and one to the outer tube — and soldered a ring of 8. I built a multivibrator, and then with quite a lot of help figured out how to get the vibrator circuit to only power up when the tilt switch was open.

Meanwhile, I ordered myself a large amount of foam rods for stuffing holes before caulking, to work as edges for the dice to land on, keeping the acrylic sides from shattering from rolling the D20. I started cutting slits in the foam rods, and hot-gluing the acrylic sides to the foam rods, while at the same time hotgluing in white LEDs for illumination and red LEDs for the blinky circuit. Eventually I got to testing the circuits, and … well …

It turns out that the ball tilt switches are extremely noisy signals. I didn’t so much detect tilt as anything touching, disturbing or moving any part of the D20 in any way whatsoever. Shortly after realizing this, a couple of wires pulled out of their soldering joints on a board hotglued down generously deep inside the glued up dice. So I gave up on the blinky plans, and hotglued in a few more white LEDs for illumination.

The end result has 4 battery-packs with switches packed in under the foam rods, each taking a pair of coin cells. These battery packs drive LEDs on the inside arranged so that they illuminate all sides from the inside. In use, this gives the D20 numbers that show up as eerily glowy purple numbers around the red reflective surface.

We test-rolled the D20 several times in the space as I had finished gluing it together — and then I took it down to the Christmas show. Before going, I wrapped the entire thing in Christmas paper, and managed to keep it quiet from the actors and the director. As we all entered the theatre, I took the 5 in D20 from the table the Director / GM had set up, and put my own 2 ft D20 there instead. The audience all settled into our seat, and the show got started.

Making it a surprise, unfortunately, means that I wasn’t able to give any sort of instructions to the GM on how to roll the dice, and she managed to throw it high in the air, breaking 6-7 hot glue joints in the process. We caught it all on video: enjoy!

by Mikael Vejdemo-Johansson at September 13, 2017 01:24 AM

September 12, 2017

NYC Resistor

#Noisebridge10th – A Hackerspace Anniversary

I’m a transcoastal transplant: my first hackerspace was Noisebridge, and I joined the day they opened their first space on 83c Wiese in September 2008. I was an active member until I left the Bay area in 2011.

Sutro Tower, for me personally the fundamental icon of San Francisco, and of Noisebridge.

This makes me about a year later to the party than the founding members of the Early Three: NYC Resistor, Noisebridge and HacDC all three came out of inspiration from the same Chaos Computer Camp in 2007 – the celebration of this start is what I’ll be writing about here.

Since I had been a member since the first day Noisebridge opened their doors, it felt quite natural to come to town for the Big 10th Anniversary Gala Weekend. For me the celebrations started early – my old Noisebridger friends joined me both for Szechuan dinner immediately after arriving on Thursday, and for my usual back-in-SF bar round on Friday. Since we were a thick pile of relatively old school Noisebridgers — ranging from those who helped make it all happen 10 years ago (Turkshead, DrShiny…) through those of us who were there when the space opened (me!) and to those who got in the game years later, but played large and important roles in shaping the space, or even those who were instrumental in the recent reboot (Hephaestus, Daravinne, …) – a natural point for the pre-party-partying to reach was, of course, the Telling Of Stories: even before the celebrations officially started, a few of us howled with laughter over The Sofa incident, over The Meth In The Cleanup incident, the ins-and-outs of The DJ Booth and of various guerilla moves to enable or disable use of the booth and a long sequence of other old anecdotes – each of them, this being Noisebridge, directly connected to a long long flame war conducted over IRC and Email.

As the Saturday celebration starts, Mitch Altman starts his talk on The History of Noisebridge by inviting me up on the stage; the engraved plaque with NYC Resistor congratulating Noisebridge was formally presented to Mitch representing Noisebridge.

Mitch continues to describe how TV-b-gone took him to HOPE took him to CCC which sparked the creation of Noisebridge, HacDC and NYC Resistor: “If I had a hacker space here in San Francisco I wouldn’t have to wait for the next hacker con to spend time with sufficiently nerdy people”

Noisebridge has held meetings Every Tuesday, since the first group formed at Chaos Computer Camp in August 2007, even before the first space opened in September 2008. Consensus, Do-ocracy and “Be Excellent To Each Other” were the design principles of the opening space. With my and S’s experiences from running Swedish non-profit associations and clubs, the governing principles seemed to be an obvious recipe for disaster — we have been waiting for the terminal meltdown of the organization ever since, and 10 years down the road, the anarchist space is (in spite of all our expectations) is still going strong. Admittedly, an endless source of drama, and an experimental petri dish for hackerspace design principles — but still thanks to hard work put in by many members through the years still actually going strong.

After Mitch’s historical overview — touching not only on the joint roots of Noisebridge, HacDC and NYC Resistor, but also on his experiences helping found Chinese hackerspaces, teaching hackerspace design in Egypt, and also The Story of The Reboot — after some extreme even for Noisebridge drama in 2014, a disgruntled persona-non-grata filed a complaint for code violations, giving Noisebridge the chance to completely close down the space, throw out *everyone* and then gradually re-introduce members to the space with a far tighter control over membership, access, and community supportiveness. With the more restrictive model, the space now is cleaner than I think I have ever seen it, and from what little I have seen on this visit the community seems significantly healthier than I remember it when I left.

The afternoon was filled with project shows, workshops and activities, culminating in the Stupid Hackathon Retrospective — people presenting Really Stupid Hacks, featuring such great stupid hacks as the Eulogizer (automatic eulogies…), the No-Tifier (a wooden block with a vibration circuit scrounged off of an old phone to make it buzz regularly 24/7), a cattle-prod selfie-stick, a Singularity Countdown based on Ray Kurzweil’s age and actuarial tables, a deo-stick for buttering toast and a Character-based RNN a la Karpathy, trained on Noisebridge Meeting Notes — Deep Learning to generate Drama!

As the Time Traveler party part of the evening started revving up, at the far back, a group setup an HTC Vive with a full 3D-scan of Noisebridge, inviting people to come walk around in the same space, but without the masses of people crowding the entire space. In the next room over, someone was displaying Rohrschach patterns — together with both label predictions from a vision system and Deep Dream creepy images generated from them.

The party gains momentum, with a cash bar — Bulleit Bourbon and Club Mate being the drink of the night — a dance floorm, karaoke, live magic show and a jostling crowd of utter strangers. The small clique of 2008-2010 era Noisebridgers cluster together in the back classroom and reminisce.

As for Sunday, while some of the most enticing events were scheduled here — the Noisebridge Fireside Chat with a good selection of Old Noisebridgers reminiscing, and 5 Minutes of Fame, the long running lightning talk event series — my flight back to NYC had wheels up at 3pm. So instead of continuing the party, we stopped for waffles with Turkshead, reminisced some more and then went to the airport.

by Mikael Vejdemo-Johansson at September 12, 2017 02:29 AM

September 07, 2017

Nottinghack

Join the Nottinghack Crapathon on Saturday, 21 October!

It’s time again for the annual…

NOTTINGHAM HACKSPACE CRAPATHON!

Saturday, 21 October!

Poster for the CRAPATHON

Conceptualise and create projects with no value whatsoever!

  1. Create a problem no one has!
  2. Design a solution!
  3. Build it!
  4. Demo it!
  5. Win a crap award!

Rough schedule will be:

  • 12:00PM – It starts! There’s a spiel! You can use things! Go!
  • 7:00PM – You’re done! Stop making stuff! Eat food!
  • 8:00PM – Demos! Voting! Awards! Socialise! (Bring a bottle)
  • Late: GO HOME!

Stuck for ideas? Some of the Crapathon entries over the past two years were:

  • Spray can shaker
  • Fan-powered ghost
  • Magic Hate Ball
  • Bunny Ocarinas
  • Monkey with rolling eyes
  • Cheesoid the Robot
  • Suggestions box that automatically shreds and files all submissions
  • Robot that badly plays the Theremin so you don’t have to
  • Automatic face-recognising laser blinder
  • Rocket salad launcher
  • A box for THE ONE TRUE GOD

This is FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Work individually or in teams. Spectators also welcome!

by Kate at September 07, 2017 03:21 PM

September 01, 2017

NYC Resistor

LEARN ALL THE THINGS in September

We have so many exciting classes coming up in September. Whether you want to make adorable floating plant planets, set up your security game with TAILS, or learn to build your own electronics circuits, we’ve got something for you this month.

Sep 9: Laser Cutting
Sep 10: Pseudonymous Identities with TAILS
Sep 16: Intro to Arduino: Sensors and Input/Output
Sep 17: Kokedama Make-Along
Sep 23: Circuit Basics

by Bonnie Eisenman at September 01, 2017 02:50 PM

August 30, 2017

NYC Resistor

Amateur Digital Archeology at Def Con 25

Some of the craft night visitors may have noticed me infrequently show up at resistor to work on some strange looking laptops over the past year. These laptops were 2 space flight modified NASA PGSC units. These are GRiD Case model 1530 387 units that were configured custom for the Shuttle program in 1992. I recently gave a presentation these at Def Con 25. I have also compiled on a URI listed below, all of the information that I have so far uncovered relating to these systems and others like it.

Read on for more information…

Here is the Presentation from Def Con 25:

All the information related to this presentation and the two PGSC systems discussed are now being posted to this URL:
http://pgsc.space/

This was a fun project and much love to everyone at NYC Resistor who helped. Especially Chris Fenton, Adam Mayer, and Trammel Hudson.

Also check out this AWESOME 1 hour interview that Computer History Museum did with the creators of GRiD on their company:

by Matt at August 30, 2017 03:15 PM

August 25, 2017

Nottinghack

Find out how to help out at the Team Social on Saturday, 30 September!

Are you a Nottingham Hackspace member?

Have you wanted to help out?

Have you wanted to join a team, but wasn’t sure how?

Have you wanted to have a nice meal with nice people and find out how to help?

We’re having a Team Social on Saturday, 30 September.

Starting around noon, this will give you a chance to find out about the various teams, ways you can volunteer at the space, and get involved!

This is also a potluck event, so bring along a nice dish and plenty of enthusiasm!

by Kate at August 25, 2017 03:51 PM

Make conversation with Alexa at the next Notts Dev Workshop!

Notts Dev Workshop

Nottingham Hackspace is happy to host the next Notts Dev Workshop on Thursday, 7 September, from 5:30pm until 8:30pm.

In this workshop, Steven Pears will be going through the stages of building two Alexa Skills using C# and AWS Lambda, as well as how users can take advantage of them through an Amazon Echo Dot.

As the popularity of smart speakers in the home rises, we’ll look at how to get users to interact with the Alexa assistant, discussing the underlying structures and adding functionality.

For this workshop, you’ll need:

  • Laptop
  • Visual Studio 2017
  • AWS Toolkit for .NET
  • AWS account

To sign up for this free workshop, join the Notts Dev Workshop Meetup group.

by Kate at August 25, 2017 03:38 PM

August 24, 2017

NYC Resistor

Our next laser class is September 9th

Pew pew! In our laser-cutting class you’ll learn everything you need to know to make the ideas in your head become a reality with a laser. And afterwards, you’ll be certified to use our laser cutter during our public Craft Nights. The next laser-cutting class  is September 9th.

Lace box

Our laser-cutting classes sell out fast, so get your tickets here.

by Bonnie Eisenman at August 24, 2017 03:33 PM

August 19, 2017

Pumping Station: One

CANstruction 2017!

Please vote TODAY for our team’s entry for CANstruction!

https://canstructionchicago.org/vote-here/

We’ve been working at PS:One for several weeks to cut template boards on the ShopBot, and we just recently constructed our sculpture of WALL-E and EVE

Here’s a time-lapse video of our build 

Canstruction is a unique world wide charity which hosts competitions, exhibitions and events showcasing colossal structures made entirely out of full cans of food.

Canstruction Chicago (under the umbrella of Canstruction) is a design/build event which benefits the Greater Chicago Chicago Food Depository. Teams comprised of professionals from the AEC industry fundraise for, design, and build structures composed of non perishable food items. These “Cansculptures” are housed in the first floor of the Merchandise Mart and are on display to the public as a giant art exhibition. The “Cansculptures” are judged in various categories by a celebrity chef and prominent members of the AEC industry. Canstruction Chicago culminates in an awards presentation and cocktail party at the Merchandise Mart.

WALL-Eat

Working to eliminate food waste and reliEVE hunger

In our world today, 40% of all food goes to waste. Fast forward 700 years and we might find WALL-E, a hardworking and lovable robot, all alone on Earth,  compacting debris into solid block structures. WALL-E knows all too well what waste looks like, yet remains hopeful that life may again be sustained on Earth. Upon meeting an advanced search-droid named EVE, WALL-E discovers companionship and how, together, they can nurture Earth back to a healthy balance and sustain all living creatures. With the help of our sponsors, WALL-E and EVE are working to educate humans about food waste and reliEVE hunger.

 

The post CANstruction 2017! appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by shua at August 19, 2017 03:19 AM

August 18, 2017

NYC Resistor

Pseudonymous Identities with TAILS Workshop on September 10

NYC Resistor is offering a TAILS workshop on Sunday, September 10th, where attendees will learn how to keep a secret online identity in a USB drive. This pragmatic workshop is designed for journalists, activists, or anyone else interested in digital pseudonymity. Participants will learn how to set up a subpoena-ready “rogue” Twitter account, as well as general operational security practices, from our member David Huerta. Get your tickets here!

TAILS is an operating system that will let you keep a secret online identity in a USB drive. Aside from its worst-case-scenario-protection security design, TAILS routes all internet traffic through TOR, a global anonymity network, which allows anyone to use the internet without correlating what you do on the internet to your daytime identity.

by Bonnie Eisenman at August 18, 2017 07:12 PM

August 16, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 15 August 2017

Your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to go to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at August 16, 2017 06:33 PM

August 08, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 8 August 2017

Your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to go to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn

Where do you scan for news?

Any one who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits is, of course, in a state of sin. 

— “Various techniques used in connection with random digits” by John von Neumann in Monte Carlo Method (1951)

The Wired the article “Meet Alex, the Russian Casino Hacker Who Makes Millions Targeting Slot Machines,” brought to my attention via Schneier, highlights what some observational legwork, patience and a big payout can accomplish.  The failure to use a proper random number algorithm put these machines at risk, but what constitutes “proper random number algorithm”?  In security there is the concept of  practically or semantically secure vs perfectly secure. Your system is “secure enough” if it would take an obscene amount of time and effort, that you don’t think anyone would bother to spend, to crack it. As computer speeds ramp up, and well paying jobs for people go down, it will be hard to overestimate just how much work people will be willing to do for a payoff.  What the folks were doing IN the casinos was pretty mind numbingly boring.  Better get some better random number generators (Or, you know, make it easier to get more interesting, better paying work. Security isn’t just crypto). To understand what “better” means in this context – check out the following resources.

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at August 08, 2017 07:24 PM

Tuesday Sweep: 1 August 2017

Your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to go to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn

Where do you scan for news?

I’ve been in a self imposed deep news diet this week. This scattering of links represents a pretty decent sample of what we’ve been up to…

Enjoy.

 

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at August 08, 2017 05:16 PM

LVL1

Workshop: How to make your own perfume from essential oils

Led by amateur herbalist, Amy Shah, this class will occur on Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017, from 7 to 8:30 pm in the LVL1 classroom. We will be learning about essential oils and medicinal plants. Participants will be making their own oil based perfume which they may take home. We will also learn about alcohol based […]

by brian at August 08, 2017 01:53 PM

August 05, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Artemis 1 – Getting a Closer Look at Totality

Some fellow hackers and makers (and former PS:One members) shared an exciting project with us and we’d like to help them get the word out.

The Artemis 1 is on a mission to send a high altitude balloon into near-space on August, 21st, 2017 to film the total solar eclipse.  It’s a collaboration between the South Side Hacker Space and Chicago’s Remote Astronaut Crew.

 

 

The team is one of many participating in this NASA sponsored program, where launches all across the country will simultaneously capture video and still images of the eclipse from altitudes of 100,000 feet and more.  You can learn more about the program here:

http://eclipse.montana.edu

Artemis 1, like many before, is looking toward the sky for opportunities to teach, learn, and grow.  Leading by example through hands-on experimentation with measurable results is the best way to instill a passion for learning and a drive to reach higher.

 

Artemis 1 seeks your vital support on this campaign and the fundraising page can be found here:

https://www.generosity.com/education-fundraising/experience-the-2017-eclipse-with-us-artemis-i/x/16686555

 

More information can be found on the Artemis 1 website:

http://artemis.one

The post Artemis 1 – Getting a Closer Look at Totality appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by rtystgeeke at August 05, 2017 08:10 PM

August 03, 2017

Hackspace Manchester

Designing A USB Breakout Board!

I often need to intercept USB signals for decoding and measurement purposes.  I cut a cable apart last time I needed one but to be honest I much prefer doing things properly.  I also noticed that nobody seems to sell a similar product on Ebay, Aliexpress or Amazon!  I did find a vendor in the USA on tindie:


USB Inspector
Image Copyright - Misperry via Tindie

https://www.tindie.com/products/misperry/usb-inspector/?pt=full_prod_search

I also found this product on tindie which is similar but has a current monitoring circuit built in:

https://www.tindie.com/products/Kaktus/usbuddy-usb-development-tool/?pt=full_prod_search

A friend of mine and blog reader found this one:

https://friedcircuits.us/50?search=usb

Either of these products would work for my purposes but the first product's shipping costs from the USA seem a little extravagant and I only wanted one or two.

The second product uses pin headers to allow connection which are a bit close together for my liking. It's often the way of things.  When I cannot obtain what I want I make my own!

The circuit is very simple:


The PCB layout is a little more complicated.  I would like to keep the board as small as possible but maintain the recommended conductor impedance that a USB cable should have.  By maintaining the impedance it means that signals can be correctly measured and power is not needlessly wasted.  The USB specification document is possibly one of the hardest pieces of technical literature I have had to read.  I don't recommend it unless absolutely necessary:

http://www.usb.org/developers/docs/usb20_docs/#usb20spec

There is also a standard for USB cables which dilutes the information into a slightly more readable format (note - I am being overly sarcastic):

BS EN 62680-2-3:2015

The standard is not free to read however...but memberships to local and university libraries yields useful results.

A USB 2.0 cable must have many specifications but the two most critical that I am interested in are:

  • Cable impedance - 76.5 Ω to 103.5 Ω
  • Current carrying capability - 500 mA (standard) or 1.5 A from a dedicated charging port.

The information on the current carrying capability is confusing as there is mention of 5 amps on the wikipedia article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB#Power-use_topology

So based upon the above information we need to ensure the board layout has tracks capable of carrying 1.5 Amps of current at 5 Vdc and that the data pairs D+ and D- are routed as a differential pair with 90 ohms impedance.  I picked 90 ohms as a reasonable middle value and it was cited in this application note from Silicon Labs:

https://www.silabs.com/documents/public/application-notes/AN0046.pdf

Here is a useful article on layout guidelines for differential pairs:

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1144365

Basically I want to make sure my breakout board doesn't ruin the USB signals by interrupting them. USB cables are actually proper transmission lines and the cable should be screened and the internal cables twisted to maintain uniform impedance.  The D+ and D- tracks which are differential signals will need to be routed close together above a solid ground plane (Microstrip transmission line) ensuring that both tracks are exactly the same length.  Most PCB routing software like eagle have built in calculators and tools to assist with this.

Here is an excellent (and free) online trace width calculator:

http://www.4pcb.com/trace-width-calculator.html

I entered the following information into the calculator:

  • Current: 1.5 Amps (I'm going with the lower value specified)
  • Copper thickness: 35 µm (Standard 1 oz copper thickness for FR4 PCB material)
  • Temperature Rise: 10 °C (Just a guess)
  • Ambient Temperature: 25 °C (Just a guess)
  • Trace Length: 35 mm (just a guess for now)

I'm only going to have a two layer PCB so I'm only interested in external traces.  Here is what the calculator came up with:

  • Required Trace Width: 525.491 µm or 0.525491 mm
  • Resistance: 33.612 mΩ
  • Voltage Drop: 50.419 mV
  • Power Loss: 75.628 mW

So that sets the PCB track thickness to be at least 0.6 mm.  I may well go with 1 mm as space should not be a problem.

Next we need to set the track impedance above a ground plane which is otherwise known as a microstrip transmission line.  Here is another very useful (and free) calculator:

https://www.eeweb.com/toolbox/edge-coupled-microstrip-impedance

If people need to read up on what an edge coupled microstrip layout is then please check out the link below.  It is essentially a method of setting the impedance of PCB tracks based upon the thickness and width of the track, the thickness of the dielectric material (FR4 PCB) and Wheeler's Equation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microstrip

Transmission line theory is complicated and to be honest I have no intention of attempting to simplify it...I'm not sure that I could.  Basically this is some of the RF black magic people talk about.... I'm trying to keep things simple.  I would suggest that anyone who is serious about electronics and electrical signal propagation needs to have a basic understanding of transmission line theory and how to layout PCB tracks to properly interface connectors with circuits.

Here is what I fed into to the calculator:

Trace Thickness: 35 µm (Standard 1 oz copper thickness for FR4 PCB material)
Substrate Height: 1.6 mm (Standard FR4 PCB)
Trace Width: 1.5 mm (I chose 1 mm value above but went for 1.5 mm to get the right impedance)
Trace Spacing: 0.12 mm (I chose this value as a guess after trying a few different values)
Substrate Dielectric: 4 (This is the relative permittivity of FR4 PCB material)

The calculated result gives a differential impedance of 89.8 Ω - close enough!  So all that's needed is to set the D+ and D- tracks to be 0.12 mm apart and 1.5 mm thick and try to keep the tracks the same length...If we manage that we have the 89.8 Ω impedance needed to ensure that the USB signals remain unaffected when we use the PCB.

Now that we have all of the track properties calculated we can design the PCB layout.  There is a tool in Eagle for doing this that ensures that the differential tracks are routed together.  You have to label the net names with an 'underscore P' and an 'underscore N'.  I set the label for my D+ and D- nets to 'TEST_P' and 'TEST-_N' but any sensible names will do.  I then routed the +V and GND tracks manually and then set the autorouter to route the top layer.  I cannot seem to get the differential pair tool to work otherwise.  Here is what the board layout looks like:


Edit - I have updated the design after some valuable feedback from Aamir Ahmed Khan (Thank you!) - I did not remember to set the track separation distance in my original layout, I have rectified that and my calculations.  Here is the new and now hopefully correct layout.  (Note to self - I should not rush when designing PCB layouts and writing informative blog posts!).  I found the easiest way to do this was to set the grid to 0.2 mm spacing with the alternative at 0.1 mm and route the differential tracks by hand one after the other.  That enabled me to ensure the tracks were correctly separated and of the correct thickness.  I also set the ground plane isolation to be 0.2 mm to ensure the track on the bottom layer was correctly isolated...Lets see if this works!  I hope the PCB fabricators are able to etch the board for me with such precise track isolation...I can always run a scalpel down the gap though.

I will probably get the whole thing manufactured by Elecrow and for that I will need a bill of materials.

Qty Device Package Parts Vendor Part Number Description







1 USB 2.0 Socket USB X1 Farnell 2134385 AMP USB 2.0 connector
4 Ring_Test 1X01_LONGPAD +V, D+, D-, GND Ebay.co.uk 292175228920 Ring Test Connector
1 M02PTH3 1X02_LONGPADS JP7 Farnell 3418285 Standard 2-pin 0.1" header pins
1 USB 2.0 Connector USB-A-H JP1 Farnell 1696544 USB Connectors








Here is the PCB render:




My plan is to have ten boards made, keep two for myself and flog the rest!

That's all for now - Langster!

by langster1980 at August 03, 2017 08:41 PM

July 26, 2017

Nottinghack

Hackspace 2.5 Update

Every Tuesday night, our brave group of volunteers spend their evening developing the downstairs of Hackspace 2.5.

See the latest update thanks to Dominic Morrow and Howard Smith:

Would you like to help out with Hackspace 2.5? Come along on Tuesday night, or find out more on the #hackspace2point5 channel on the Nottingham Hackspace Team Slack (available to members via HMS).

by Kate at July 26, 2017 08:49 PM

Get started with DevOps at the Notts Dev Workshop!

Notts Dev Workshop

Nottingham Hackspace is happy to host the next Notts Dev Workshop on Friday, 4th August, from 5:30pm until 8:30pm.

DevOps (a portmanteau of “development” and “operations”) is a software development and delivery process that emphasises communication and collaboration between product management, software development, and operations professionals.

In this workshop, Matteo Emilli will be helping attendees put a small application in the cloud, including the creation of a pipeline, the definition of your Infrastructure as Code, the packaging process, and the release. More advanced practices will also be discussed, like silent deployments, feature flags, and the use of telemetry in your application.

Matteo is an Application Lifecycle Management and DevOps advisor, as well as a Microsoft MVP for Visual Studio and Development Technologies, with a passion for Agile Methodologies and Processes.

For this workshop, you’ll need:

  • Laptop
  • Visual Studio 2017
  • Azure Tools for Visual Studio
  • Azure PowerShell
  • Azure Account
  • VSTS Account

To sign up for this free workshop, join the Notts Dev Workshop Meetup group.

by Kate at July 26, 2017 08:30 PM

Laboratory B

Burlington Hacker Book Club!

We're excited to add a new event to the Lab's roster: the BTV Hacker Book Club! The group will be meeting monthly to discuss a book drawn from a list built by Lab members, with members voting on which book from the list to read each month. While Lab members pick the books, all who have read the book are welcome to the discussions, and attendees are welcome to bring munchies and beverages to share.

Our first pick is A Hacker Manifesto by media theorist McKenzie Wark, and we'll be gathering for the discussion on Thursday, 8/17 at 6pm in the Couch Room. For more details and updates, RSVP to the Facebook event.

We'll be discussing setting a recurring monthly date at the August meeting, and Lab members are presently voting on the September book pick. Cyberpunk classic Neuromancer by William Gibson currently holds a narrow lead, but there are a few more days for members to weigh in...

The post Burlington Hacker Book Club! appeared first on Laboratory B.

by Matt Cropp at July 26, 2017 04:30 PM

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 25 July 2017

Okay okay, so I have a cat-addled brain, but here… JUUUUUUUSSSST under the wire is your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and I hope you went to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at July 26, 2017 05:23 AM

July 25, 2017

Hackspace Manchester

Having electronic breakout boards manufactured in China by Elecrow

I have an online shop where I sell some of the items I have designed and written about.  I normally have the PCBS made in china and then populate them and test them myself at my local hackspace or when I'm in a rush on the kitchen worktop - Note to young engineers: a surer method of annoying your significant other I have yet to find!

It is often quite stressful and difficult for me to hand solder surface mount components. I have to test and fault find the circuit and get everything working....after that shipping the orders in good time only compounds the issues.  It's all about being prepared and patient...I am not always good at being prepared and then my patience wears thin!

I get my PCBS made in China by a company called Elecrow:

https://www.elecrow.com/

They sell all sorts of useful bits and pieces for the electronics hobbyist and also have a PCB manufacturing service and now more recently a PCB assembly service.

I have had at least fifty PCBS made by Elecrow and the quality has always been excellent.  The price has always been acceptable and the service excellent.  I may have also quietly lost my temper with my ineptitude in assembling surface mount components on small printed circuit boards and decided to see how much it would actually cost to get the whole product made by Elecrow.

I saw the new service advertised on the site and clicked on the appropriate page:

https://www.elecrow.com/pcb-assembly-p-366.html

Next I uploaded the gerber files for the project in a zip file along with the bill of materials with at least two sources for the components and the package sizes.  Ensuring the design is correct and the bill of materials is correct is critical...I cannot stress this part enough!

The initial price I paid to have the project assessed and the printed circuit boards and solder stencil made was £32.05 or $41.76 USD. This all started on a Sunday night on the 23rd of June.

A very helpful lady named Shelley got in contact within a day to say the order had been received but production would not start as they couldn't open the bill of materials spreadsheet I had sent with the gerber files.  I made the mistake of not uploading the bill of materials in the Microsoft Excel format, very quickly resolved by resending the BOM in the correct file format.

Shelley got in contact within a few days to provide a quote for fitting the standard components or for fully populating the PCB.  The full cost was another £61.41 or $80 USD for ten fully completed PCBS which I thought was quite reasonable so I sent the money over and hoped for the best.

I also sent through some basic instructions and tips on how to populate the PCB gained from my own experience in doing it - I didn't want anyone else to struggle populating the PCBS like I had and I also wanted to be sure that when the boards arrived they worked first time!

On the 12th of July Shelley emailed to say that the boards had been manufactured and that component population was about to start.  She did say that they had issues with the Op-Amp I had chosen but this was sorted pretty quickly....luckily my circuit will work with just about any Op-Amp so I wasn't too worried.

On the 18th of July I got an email from someone named Sunshine to say that the my order was complete and shipped by DHL.  I didn't actually bother tracking it but it arrived today on the 24th of July, well packaged in a sturdy cardboard box and bubble wrap.  Each PCB was individually wrapped in a zip lock anti-static bag with some anti-static foam on the header pins.

Every single one of the boards worked perfectly.  Here are some photos of the PCB etc...I didn't take any of my smiling face!!!  The coin is a one pence sterling coin for scale.

Populated Pressure Sensors From Elecrow!
Check out the reflow soldering!

For the price (£93.46 or $121.76) I am very happy with the service that Elecrow provided and I will be getting more of these boards and other boards fully populated when I need to.  Shelley did say that If I get a higher quantity of PCBS made up the price quoted would reduce.  I just hope I manage to sell them all so that I can get more things made...maybe I should spend more time advertising over designing and blogging?!??

I doubt that I will ever sell enough of these to retire but I do enjoy keeping my hand in the manufacturing process - it is very useful to know how to get things made and if I ever do come up with a cunning plan...I mean product I can realise it fairly quickly and efficiently with Elecrow's help.

That's all for now - Langster!



by langster1980 at July 25, 2017 07:56 AM

July 20, 2017

CrashSpace

On Cats and Typing: An Intersection of Machine Learning and Robotics

Guest speaker Elecia White will describe the twists and turns on the path to making a voice-controlled typing robot for her own education and amusement. She’ll show a slightly scary demo of the state-of-the-art machine learning platform then describe the applications of machine learning to robotics (and some of the steps necessary to do so). She will discuss the architecture of her system in its current and plans for the future. Finally, she will demonstrate control of a small, affordable robot arm.

Follow Elecia’s adventures in the worlds of machine learning and robotics.

Elecia White is the host of the Embedded.FM podcast, author of O’Reilly’s Making Embedded Systems, and founder of Logical Elegance, an embedded systems consulting company.

When: July 19th, 8pm
Where: Crashspace!
Cost: FREE
Other: There will be some sort of pastry or baked goods!

Edit: Here are the show notes. Thanks Elecia for the talk and thanks everyone for joining us at Crash!

Typing cats care of Giphy and does not represent any material expected in the talk.

by Kevin at July 20, 2017 03:42 AM

July 18, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 18 July 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn

Where do you scan for news?

Today’s sweep was attacked, killed and dragged back to his fortress by the fellow in the picture above. The internet has won. We (Tod and I) have a cat.

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at July 18, 2017 11:29 PM

NYC Resistor

Learn to Solder on July 23rd

Our next soldering class will be July 23rd. We’ll be teaching through-hole soldering and desoldering, and give you plenty of chance to practice as you make an LED tile.

by Bonnie Eisenman at July 18, 2017 02:29 PM

July 17, 2017

NYC Resistor

DIY Smart Lamp with ESP8266 & Amazon Echo

I upgraded a cool vintage lamp to work with voice commands through my Amazon Echo using an ESP8266 microcontroller and relay circuit. The fauxmoESP Arduino library is what does the heavy lifting in this project; it emulates a Belkin WeMo device, so the Alexa app setup is exactly the same as the store-bought device. I hollowed out the wooden base of the lamp to enclose the electronics, and installed a power override switch that controls the light independently of the voice commands. The full tutorial is on Instructables, and I talk through the code in the video.

Wanna get started with Arduino? Sign up for our September 16 class: Intro to Arduino: Sensors and Input/Output

by Becky Stern at July 17, 2017 03:17 PM

July 14, 2017

NYC Resistor

Our elevator is broken :(

PSA to Craft Night guests: our elevator is not working tonight. Apologies to anyone who needs it.

by Bonnie Eisenman at July 14, 2017 12:23 AM

July 13, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Shine on You Crazy KiCAD — and Other Tales from Chris Gammell

Chris GammellOn Monday July 17th, NERP will host Chris Gammell. Chris is an analog electrical engineer and product manager. He may be known to some of you as co-host of The Amp Hour, and as the charter member of Contextual Electronics. CE offers subscription based electronics courses with different levels of project-oriented learning and personal interaction with an instructor. The Amp Hour is a non-scripted off-the-cuff format show that usually airs every Thursday evening US time. It is the worlds largest and most respected electronics oriented radio show. Discussions range from hobbyist electronics to the state of the electronics industry, components, circuit design, and general on and off-topic rants.

At the NERP on Monday, Chris will present a free rendition of  the Contextual Electronics course titled Shine On You Crazy KiCad. NERP has talked about the open source electronic design program called KiCAD before, but this presentation is different. It’s designed for simplicity and fast execution to give a quick win for new users who follow along on their own laptops. The course is designed as an end-to-end art-to-part experience using KiCAD.  amphour logoWhen I say quick, I mean just 20 minutes start to finish to draw an electronic schematic and then translate the schematic into a printed circuit board PCB layout. (It’s possible to spend lots of days working on a complex circuit board design…) After that, the last step in the process will be for everybody who’s following along to pack up their KiCAD PCB layout files and send them off to OSH Park to actually be made into atoms and snail-mailed back to you. Chris’s demo board is a small, but useful add-on for a Raspberry Pi. The PCB is about 1″ square, so the cost at OSH Park is very small.

made with kicadEven if you don’t plan on actually making the circuit, go ahead and load up a copy of KiCAD  http://kicad-pcb.org/download/ so you can at least have a look and ask questions. It’s open source and free. Win, Mac, & Linux. Kicad is a pretty piece of software in my opinion, and I have a few good reasons for preferring it to Eagle (KiCAD’s freemium competitor).

Chris tells me there’s one thing that NERP might be able to help him with. Contextual Electronics is getting a new course for “absolute beginners” in electronics. This would be along the lines of “what do you need to know about electronics before even thinking of a course like CE”. When you first encounter a subject as broad and deep as electronics, it’s very hard to sort out the signal from the noise. You can spend a lot of effort on something that doesn’t matter while at the same time missing some small Rosetta stone or simple concept that’s perhaps in easy reach. conceptual electronics logoAfter we move past those first trembling steps, we can forget what it was like just building a knowledge framework. To make the best connections with absolute beginners, Chris wants to hear about your conceptual roadblocks or things you wish you’d known from long (or not so long) ago, and how they resolved (or didn’t resolve) themselves. I’m sure he’ll be happy to talk about it at NERP, but consider signing up for CE and visit the Building an absolute beginner course page and add your thoughts.

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

www.meetup.com /NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/­
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/­

Tags: Beagle Bone,electronics,embedded,hackerspace,NERP,Open Source,Pumping Station: One,raspberry pi,OSH Park,The Amp Hour,Contextual Electronics

The post Shine on You Crazy KiCAD — and Other Tales from Chris Gammell appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by edbennett at July 13, 2017 05:12 PM

July 12, 2017

CrashSpace

Net Neutrality Day of Action 2017

Today’s the day folks! Once again, the FCC has targeted Net Nuetrality. Today’s the day to speak your mind, if you haven’t already.

by carlyn at July 12, 2017 08:11 PM

Tuesday Sweep: 11 July 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn: Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

  • Eirik Brandal makes instruments from structural circuits. Wow. So cool, with an aesthetic that reminds me of Duchamp a little.  Watch the video (via BoingBoing again!)
  • EFF “Who has your back?” List is out for 2017. This annual list reviews several large companies based on each company’s policies on how, when and whether to comply with government data request.  A shout out to the companies that aced this particular test:  Adobe, Credo, Dropbox, Lyft, Pinterest, Sonic, Uber, Wickr, and WordPress. I highly recommend not just scanning the pretty chart, but reading at least the executive summary as well.
  • Want to perform a billion billion calculations per second? Then you want an exscale super computer. The US has just gotten serious about being first again. The New Yorker, of all places, had an interesting discussion about what massive computing power means in the cryptoworld using Quantum Computing as the bugbear. TL;DR? IEEE puts it in the headline “Quantum Computer Comes Closer to Cracking RSA Encryption,” but I like the Quartz media article better because it quotes Poe.
  • Speaking of an Arms Race. I’ll admit I’ve been low level freaking out ever since I watched Adobe unveiled VoCo by making Keegan-Michael Key’s voice talk about making out with Jordan Peele. I’m glad that the folks at Wired have given themselves leave to freaked out the potential for forgeries, (via Schneier) too. If fake news is bad now… WHEW. We’re in for it. Time to update all those guides on how to assess a primary source… That said, humanity did live in a time BEFORE video was widely available, and this time it wasn’t that long ago. We can at least forward to the increased quality in video/AR games.
  • I missed writing much about NotPetya, and its motives, but apparently, once again, it could have been avoided by keeping updated. That said, many firms have legacy software they’ve custom rolled at great expense and honestly don’t know what the consequences will be for updating. If this is you or someone you love, try out Wine “a compatibility layer capable of running Windows applications on several POSIX-compliant operating systems”. In other words, you can run .exe files directly without launching an emulator. If your CXO’s like paying for things try the commercial version CrossOver which purportedly takes the some of the pain out of the equation of configuring Wine correctly. You can keep your Linux up-to-date without harming the ability to keep running the old software running on that old hardware.
  • This all said, Jake Williams had an excellent point in the SANS Newsletter 54  “Infosec basics like principles of least privilege would have done more to protect networks [from NotPetya]more than disabling SMB1.”  That Phrase “Least Privlege” was coined in a 1975 paper by J.H. Saltzer and M.D. Schroeder called  ‘Basic Principles of Information Protection’  I’m squarly in the camp that security is a process, not a product, and discussions of technologies should not be at the exclusion of design patterns. So I’m just going to leave some links here, partially for my own reference.

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at July 12, 2017 01:14 AM

July 06, 2017

Nottinghack

Introduction to Arduino Workshop on Saturday, 2nd September

Nottingham Hackspace will be hosting an all-day Introduction to Arduino Workshop, run by James Fowkes and Ian Dickinson, on Saturday, 2nd September.

The Arduino system is a microcontroller board and software designed for extreme ease-of-use and learning, and has been wildly successful all over the world – not just in electronics, but for all sorts of maker projects. If you want to learn how to incorporate electronic control into your projects, this is definitely the workshop for you.

This workshop will cover:

  • What an Arduino is, and how to program it
  • Components and tools
  • Basics of electronics (voltage, current, resistance, etc.)
  • Arduino input and outputs
  • Controlling high-power components
  • Analog output
  • And more!

Aimed for complete beginners, this workshop doesn’t require you to have written a single line of code, switched on a soldering iron or even own an Arduino to take part. All the electronics equipment, including Arduino boards, will be provided on the day, but you will need to bring a laptop to program the Arduino with. It would also help if you installed the Arduino software onto your laptop before the workshop.

This workshop will run from 11am to 4pm, with a break for lunch at 1pm, and will cost £25, which includes use of all tools, boards and components, and free tea or coffee.

Arduino Unos will be available to purchase for £18 and Arduino Starter Kits will be available to purchase for £35. Please bring cash if you would like to buy either of these.

You can purchase your tickets now at EventBrite. This is a very popular workshop, so please buy your tickets early to avoid disappointment.

by Kate at July 06, 2017 08:00 AM

July 05, 2017

Pumping Station: One

How to make a ring out of scrap copper.

IMG_20170702_165616661

I found a piece of scrap copper pipe and decided to make a ring out of it.

Note: This article has also been posted on the NineWaysToLife blog. All the media included is personal. I am a member of PS:One and made this project on its premises. 

IMG_20170702_165630513

I sawed the copper pipe into a width that I thought would work well for a ring. Don’t forget that the ring will widen a bit when you will hammer it out later.

I used a file and some rough-grit sandpaper on the sawed edge of the ring in order to ensure that the edge was straight.

IMG_20170702_174146796

I then performed the annealing process with an acetylene torch. Heat the copper up until it is cherry-red-hot. Immediately quench the red-hot copper in a container of water. The sooner it is quenched the better.

The annealing process is an important step and changes the molecular structure of the copper. This change reduces the hardness of the copper and causes it to be more easily worked. It also reduces the chances for the metal to crack while being worked upon.

The softening of the metal’s crystalline structure by annealing is not reversed by time or temperature but is only reversed by working on the metal. This reverting of the metal back to its original state due to the stresses placed upon it by the work you perform is called “work hardening”.

Due to the work hardening (caused by the hammering, as will be seen below), I needed to anneal an additional time during my crafting process.

IMG_20170702_174320698

The next step in the process directly after annealing is “pickling”. The “Pickle” is an acid bath that removes the layer of copper oxide and that forms on the copper ring from the heat during the annealing process.

Fun Science Fact: No ferrous metals are allowed in the pickle as that reverses the stripping effect that the pickle has on the copper that you placed in it. Allowing steel or iron into the pickle will cause the copper molecules to bind to whatever you later place in the pickle, instead of removing the stains or impurities. This can be very frustrating, especially for people working with non-copper metals such as silver. Nobody wants a copper-covered piece of silver!

Note: On my first unsupervised pickling I made a mistake and used a pair of steel tongs, that someone had left near the pickle area, to remove my ring from the pickle. That mistake required me to neutralize the acid in the pickle to a pH level of 7 (neither acid nor base) by adding baking soda to the acid bath until it stopped reacting and then flushing it down the sink. I then made a new pickle, much to the delight of my fellow craftsmen, since that obviated them doing the work themselves (I have a hunch that someone planted that pair of tongs to get me to change the pickle… I’m just kidding, I was happy to learn!).

IMG_20170702_180412021

Now that the metal was nicely softened up by the annealing process it was time to work it. I measured my finger size on our ring sizer and determined that my pinky was a size 6.5 – 7. Since the original size of the copper ring was about a 4, I needed to expand it. I expanded the ring by using a hammer (with a shiny head surface since shiny heads transfer their shine to the object being hit, in this case, my ring. Scratched up heads transfer those scratches to the object which is a good reason to be careful with your jewelry hammers.) and a ring mandrel (a tapered piece of metal that has ring sizes marked on the side). I beat the ring until it reached the size that I required, remembering to flip the ring every once in a while in order to achieve a uniform spread. Remember, as mentioned above, the metal will thin and spread a little during this step of the process.

The shiny head on my hammer created this beautiful beaten-metal pattern on the ring which I really enjoyed. I hope to use that gorgeous pattern in further pieces.

IMG_20170702_183507519

Now, most of the difficult work has been accomplished and all that is left is the embellishment and design. I experimented with a piece of scrap copper (above) and a selection of chasing punches to find a pattern I enjoyed. (Note the chasing hammer and its dirty and scratched head in stark contrast to my earlier admonition to keep the heads of jewelry hammers smooth and shiny. Chasing hammers are the one exception to that rule as they are used to hammer on metal tools and utensils like chasing punches and dapping punches and never comes in direct contact with the actual metal being worked on.)

I found this pattern to be one that I enjoyed and hammered it into my ring while it was seated on the previously mentioned ring mandrel.

IMG_20170702_201621662

I then took the nearly finished ring and sanded the edges and inside with fine-grit sandpaper.

(Notice how the marks from the chasing punches are barely noticeable? Let’s move on to the next and final step in this process in order to remedy that.)

IMG_20170702_203931816

I then submerged the ring in a solution of hot water and liver of sulfur (and no, that is not a witches brew, rather a chemical mixture). This darkens the metal and adds a patina. I can choose to what extent the metal darkens by how long I keep the ring immersed in the liver of sulfur and how much I buff it (Scotch-Brite is the preferred tool for buffing).

IMG_20170702_205104401

Ta Da! The One Ring has been reforged! Now, all must tremble befor…. I mean, how neat is this ring that I made!? Now, you can make one too! (With access to high-powered heating tools, specialized jewelry-making equipment, chemicals with funny sounding names, and an awesome Pandora playlist, that is.)

Note: Notice the impressions made by the chasing punch are now much more vivid. That is due to the darkening of the metal by the liver of sulfur and the subsequent removal of much of it from the surface of the ring, but not from within the impressions themselves. This creates a lighter/darker effect which gives the impressions much more depth, perspective, and a greater contrast.

How did you enjoy this project? What did you learn from it? Has it inspired you to go out and make something? Please let me know in the comments below.

Note: A special thank you goes to Aushra Abouzeid for painstakingly stepping me through this project and for her wonderful patience in explaining how not to blow myself up with the acetylene torch as well as how to refresh the pickle (which I managed to ruin almost immediately after her back was turned, obviously).

-Baka

The post How to make a ring out of scrap copper. appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by baka at July 05, 2017 03:52 PM

July 04, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 4 July 2017

Happy 4th of July! Hey, USA! We’re in serious need of some family counseling, but you’re worth the trouble. Democracy matters. Happy Birthday.

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment.

If you have the day off an no plan until this evening… good chance to make some updates!

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn: Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

I <3 Fireworks so we’re going to have a fireworks themed post today.

On the history of fireworks I’m turning to the Smithsonian, an amazing American institution that I am very grateful for. Finally established by congress in 1846,  Smithsonian’s call to action for the US was to create as “an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge.” I like the sounds of that. If you do to, call your congressional representatives on Wednesday to let them know.

For videos on on how Fireworks work or are made

Stay safe and enjoy!

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at July 04, 2017 05:13 PM

June 27, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 27 June 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn: Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at June 27, 2017 10:01 PM

June 26, 2017

LVL1

Fidget Spinner

Gary’s Fidget Spinner made HackADay! Fidget-Spinning Robot Out-Uselesses Other Useless Machines

by brian at June 26, 2017 11:20 AM

June 21, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 20 June 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • Reduce your attack surface: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it.
  • Anywhere you could add two factor authorization? While you’re at it, move the password to your password manager… and delete it from everywhere else.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Excerpt from SANS Newsletter:

Stack Clash Vulnerability
(June 19, 2017)
A memory management vulnerability affecting a number of open source operating systems (OSes), including Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSDm FreeBSD, and, and amd64, could be exploited to corrupt memory and allow arbitrary code execution. Dubbed Stack Clash, the flaw was discovered by researchers at Qualys. Patches for seven known affected OSes have been released and users are urged to upgrade as soon as possible. Other OSes may be affected as well.
Read more in:
– https://threatpost.com: Stack Clash Vulnerability in Linux, BSD Systems Enables Root Access
– https://arstechnica.com: Serious privilege escalation bug in Unix OSes imperils servers everywhere
– https://www.scmagazine.com: Stack Clash exploits spotted in Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD and Solaris
– https://blog.qualys.com: The Stack Clash

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at June 21, 2017 12:26 AM

June 20, 2017

LVL1

June 18, 2017

Pumping Station: One

NERP Can Reflow, and So Can You! [6-19, 7pm]

Surface Mount Technology is not a new thing. Eventually it’ll be the only thing because new MOSFETS, chips, and computer-on-modules are pretty much all SMT. If you’ve never  soldered SMT parts, you might be surprised at how easy it can be. In fairness, parts below a certain size can be challenging to solder, but with practice you can start big and go smaller and smaller as you get better. But where to start? At NERP on Monday, June 19th Drew Fustini will give a gentle introduction to SMT soldering.

Drew will be building   I can reflow! Badge  and showing the SMD Challenge board, also called the Unfortunate board because the 0201 resistor and LED will unfortunately make you nuts trying to solder them. The boards were made by , a commercial prototype and open source hardware board house. They have a huge catalog of boards designated as shared projects by their customers. You can buy those boards, or design your own in KiCAD or Eagle, and share them if you like.

Drew has a few extra reflow Badge boards if anyone wants to follow along. We’ll try to get enough parts together to fill the boards. Those parts are:

  • Q1 & Q2 – MMBT3904
  • R1 & R2 – 0805 100Ω
  • R3 & R4 – 0805 100kΩ
  • C1 & C2 – 0805 10µF

And two 0805 LEDs and a CR1220 battery clip.

Schematic diagram in Hackaday’s coverage of the I Can Reflow Merit Badge
NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/­
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/­

The post NERP Can Reflow, and So Can You! [6-19, 7pm] appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by edbennett at June 18, 2017 12:35 AM

June 14, 2017

NYC Resistor

Visitor project: Dominion storage solution

Dominion is an award-winning deck-building card game that has ten expansions released as of this writing. There are a wide variety of proposed storage solutions to the problem of toting about several thousand cards and sundry mats and tokens, and Sherwin decided it was high time he moved on up from the method he had been using to a proper receptacle.

First, a look at the final product:

Wooden box sitting on its edge with the word  Open wooden box displaying contents consisting of rows of Dominion cards separated by labeled dividers.


We managed to fit about 3700 unsleeved cards along with the other odds and ends in with room for further expansion. The dividers make every card easy to locate and access, and the box dimensions keep the whole package relatively compact and portable.

Our starting point was an ad-hoc solution that involved storing each set of Kingdom cards in separate pockets on 9-card sheets, with the base cards being held in deck boxes and the tokens in a bead container, all of which were piled into one of the original game boxes and wrapped in a tote bag. This system worked for a time, but as further expansions were released, both box and tote showed increased signs of strain, neither having been designed to hold more than one game or expansion at a time.

Old, beaten Dominion Intrigue box sitting on a wooden table, overflowing with sleeved dominion cards. To its left sits a threadbare Dominion tote bag.

The sheets can be seen overflowing from the game box, which barely squeezed into the tote

The box had already been replaced once before, and when the replacement itself began showing severe signs of wear we began looking into other options. We debated building one out of lumber, but eventually settled on using a case that had been tried and tested in other storage solutions for our first attempt.

We knew that we would require some sort of organizer to keep each column of cards in line, and laser-cut some test pieces out of cardboard to check the fit.

White paper sitting on a mac laptop keyboard with seemingly random numbers and lines scribbled in blue pen. White paper fills the page. In black pen, there are lines an measurements scrawled over the page. In the upper left sits the bottom half of a pencil and a set of mechanical calipers.

Determining the dimensions of the caddy and how to fasten them

Seen from above, the right half of a wooden table is covered in two disjoint halves of a wooden box, the left is covered in white paper. Strewn over everything is a set of cardboard inserts which are white on one face and brown on the other. Wooden box with cardboard inserts fills the page. There one small stack of Dominion cards sitting in each of the six columns.

Assembling the mock caddy, then testing the fit of the cards
We also planned to engrave the game’s logo onto the box using the laser cutter, and had two waxes and two stains we wanted to try. The case came with a tray insert that was made of the same wood, though unfinished, so we did a test burn both before and after applying the four coats to observe the effect. We also removed the hardware from the case and sanded off the veneer in preparation.

Strip of birch plywood with two blury laser etched dominion logos filling it's length runs across the center of the picture. Behind it is the metal latice of a laser cutter. Wooden rectangle sites atop white paper. The words

Mocking up the logo and testing burn parameters for the wood

Blue nitrile gloved hands which come from the right side of the frame are rubbing dark wax into one of four rows on a wood box which sits on white paper. Wooden box with the words

Applying the coats of wax and stain to the test piece
The logo we used had too much background and shading for a clean burn. We ended up using Pawel Pawlak’s Dominion icons to generate an appropriate vector image of the logo and banner outline for the laser cutter.

Sheet of white cardboard on a metal grate in a laser cutter behind dirty glass. There is a blur of a moving laser cutter head over the center third of the cardboard. The beginning of an etching of the Dominion logo can be seen as a pale brown on the cardboard's surface. Sheet of white cardboard on a metal grate in a laser cutter behind dirty glass. There is a blur of a moving laser cutter head over the center third of the cardboard. A completed etching of the Dominion logo can be seen as a pale brown on the cardboard's surface.

Testing the final logo
After finalizing the dimensions of the caddy pieces and wax choice, we then cut the pieces out of clear acrylic, assembled and affixed them with acrylic glue, burned the logo into the case cover, then applied the coats of wax.

Corner of a light brown wooden box fix the lower two thirds of the frame. A sheet of clear acrylic, the height of the box, cuts a single internal column on the left hand side. Light wooden box sits atop white paper at a slight angle filling the upper two thirds of the frame. The box is divided into six columns by strips of clear acrylic which are the same height as the box itself. An additional strip of clear acrylic rests atop the left edge of the box hanging prosperously over the side.

Assembling and checking the fit of the final caddy
Light brown wooden box sits in middle frame at a slight angle atop white paper. It is mostly covered in a honey brown wax. The Dominion logo is etched in its center. Two hands connected to arms which lead off the top of the picture, are wearing blue nitirle gloves and rubbing additional wax into the surface.

Applying the wax to the case exterior

To minimize cards sliding around and give them a cushion, we cut a segment out of poker felt and glued it to the bottom with spray adhesive. We attempted to replace the stock hardware with sturdier options, but found the wood to be too thin to support any of the screws from the cabinet fixtures.

A rectangular wooden pallet has two small squares of green felt glued to the bottom right corner of the palette. A jug of wood glue, can of spray adhesive, and hand holding a hot glue gun are just out of frame. Light wooden box with a green felt base rests on its edge, filling the frame. The box's inside is divided into six vertical columns by clear acrylic. Two hands in the upper right of the frame can barely be seen screwing something into its side.

Testing different adhesives on felt samples and reattaching the hardware to the finished bottom
Finally, after completing assembly of the box, we had to transfer the actual game components from the old box to the new one. We created the divider tabs using sumpfork’s Dominion Divider Generator and had them printed on cardstock and trimmed at a local print shop.

Warm brown wooden box sits in the middle of the frame at an angle resting on butcher paper on a wodden table. The Domnion logo is etched in its center. Brass clasps are affixed to its front along with a leather and brass handle. Open light brown wooden box resting on butcher paper on a wooden table. The bottom of the box is green felt and it is divided into six columns by clear acrylic strips.

The finished box ready to receive the game materials

Resting atop a wooden table which fills the frame, from left to right there is a stack of two sheets of card sleeves full of Dominon cards, the bottom half of a Dominion box full of card sheets which are them selves full of Dominion cards, the top half of a Dominion box with three stacks of dominion cards, a light wooden box which is open, with a green felt bottom split into six columns by strips of clear acrylic, one of the columns is full of dominion cards with a second one about half full, and finally five stacks of white card paper which are barely in frame. On the right side of the table there is also a jumble of empty card sleeves. A wooden table runs at a sharp angle from the top left to the bottom right of the frame. From left to right there are: sheets of card sleeves full of dominion cards, the bottom half of a dominion box half full of full card sheets, the top half of a dominion box with three stacks of dominion cards in it, a light wooden box which is open, its base green felt, divided into six columns by clear acrylic the left most of which is full of dominion cards and dividers, finally six stacks of white card stock with dominion rules text printed on them.

Moving the cards into their new home
A light wooden box sits dead center, filling the bottom half of the frame. Its open lid fills the top half. The box is filled with dominion cards arranged in four of the six columns and separated by white card stock with card titles. The second to left column contains little plastic bags of glittering bronze tokens, and the last column is about half full of cards separated in the same manner as the first four.

Ready to play!

by zellio at June 14, 2017 04:36 AM

NYCR Members Kari Love and Matthew Borgatti teaching Soft Robotics and Bioinspiration at ITP Camp

Robots are neat, but everyone has one around the house these days. From Roomba to Alexa, there’s an army of soothing plastic helpers to help you look up actor names and eliminate your least favorite repetitive tasks. Aren’t you curious what is out there chasing the horizon of robotics, on the seam between the artificial and the biological?

Well, that’s what you’re going to learn if you’re one of the lucky ITP Camp attendees this year. Our members Kari Love and Matthew Borgatti will be teaching a class on Soft Robotics and Bioinspiration this week at NYU’s ITP. It will cover how they – real actual researchers in soft robotics – perform research, build prototypes, and solve problems with inspiration from biology. It’s also got hands-on prototyping and playful learning for everyone excited by design and creative process.

From the course description:

Roboticists frequently find inspiration from the incredible evolved forms of nature, and translate them into fresh thinking and solutions. This workshop invites you to explore this fast-growing domain where biology and robotics collide.

by Matthew Borgatti at June 14, 2017 02:08 AM

June 13, 2017

CrashSpace

YouTube Channel: Computerphile

Channel Name: Computerphile

Channel Address: https://www.youtube.com/user/Computerphile?&ab_channel=Computerphile

Who is it For?: Motivated Beginner to a CS student who needs a refresher or doesn’t like how their prof is explains things.

Why I Like It: The folks behind Computerphile create high quality computer science videos that explain the underlying algorithms and thought processes driving computer technology. Typically lasting around the 10 minutes, if one video seems too advanced chances are good they’ve included links to other videos in the description.

 

Sample Video

by carlyn at June 13, 2017 07:42 PM

June 06, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 6 June 2017

 

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s not YOU that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at June 06, 2017 11:05 PM

June 05, 2017

Pumping Station: One

NERP Tonite: MOSFETs with Ste!

Mosfets – They can be “on” — They can be “off” — They can even be in between! Tonight at NERP, entrepreneur, engineer, and really good teacher Ste Kulov will guide us into the world of mosfets. Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors if you want to impress your friends.

N-Channel MOSFET [wikipedia]

Since mosfets are a wide and deep subject, I asked Ste where he wanted to focus his talk. With great economy of words, he said it better than I could.

“Most of the generic stuff, fairly quickly.  A few simple examples I was probably going to cover are: making a logic inverter, a logic controlled load-switch, and reverse battery protection. Simulating in LTspice [circuit CAD], since I can draw that stuff in two seconds and put it on the screen.  If you want to do a power MOSFET application, I would need to see the datasheet for it.  Also keep in mind that high current stuff is no good for breadboards. If you need a list:  4 vs 3 terminal, body diode, Rds(on), gate drive, switching speed, N-channel, P-channel, CMOS digital logic, CMOS analog switches.”

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/­
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/­

Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source, raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One

The post NERP Tonite: MOSFETs with Ste! appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by edbennett at June 05, 2017 04:23 PM

June 04, 2017

LVL1

Naval Ordnance Shenanigans

Naval Ordnance is back again! Join us on Saturday, May 20th at 9am to play an exciting game of Naval Ordnance: the bigger and badder cousin of the Battleship game we all know and love. We’ll be setting up the game pool in the parking lot and will start festivities by organizing teams to compete and/or […]

by Jessica Elle at June 04, 2017 01:00 PM

May 30, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Making stuff for scientific conferences

Last year I was making little things for a conference my work organized in Chicago.

You’ll find more info on my blog posts. But as a teaser, it involved laser-cutting, glue, Inkscape and a lot of mistakes (but I didn’t took pictures of those, too bad).

Awards

A person touching a device

Slide Ruler

Circular slide-ruler in acrylic on plywood board.

The post Making stuff for scientific conferences appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by bjonnh at May 30, 2017 10:28 PM

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 30 May 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s not YOU that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at May 30, 2017 07:11 PM

Recording a Variable Strobe Light

Steve and I made a really fun fountain controlled by a bike pump for Maker Faire 2017. It was a huge hit with attendees. Unfortunately, sharing it on social media was a pain:

View post on imgur.com

This is the problem whenever you are trying to record a strobe lit object. Black bars show up on your screen. It’s possible to make them smaller with some settings, but I figured I wanted to make it completely go away. Our fountain has a variable strobe, depending on the bike pump, that makes the problem even harder to sync to.

Luckily, I had an industrial camera with a trigger input.

I was able to sync the trigger output on the 24V line of the fountain directly to the trigger input of the Cognex 2000-130 camera. I’d like to get a higher quality and different lens for this camera, but the basics worked. It showed the image fully.

View post on imgur.com

Final product becomes a nice image with no flickering and no horrible bars. Video. I used CAM Studio to record the screen on Cognex’s InSight Explorer.

If you have a strobe fountain or other effect and want to record decent video without the scan bars or hum bars, this is a possibility. Send the same output from your strobe to your camera and record the video onscreen.

More information about our levitating fountain and check out the HackADay post about it.

by Kevin at May 30, 2017 05:32 PM

May 29, 2017

NYC Resistor

We’re open for Craft Night

Holidays? What holidays! Resistor will be open as usual tonight for Craft Night / Knit Knight.

by Bonnie Eisenman at May 29, 2017 09:56 PM

LVL1

Wood working Class – A foundation Course (cutting boards)

RSVP Link Wood working sessions to teach you everything you need to know to make a cutting board and beyond! Next class is Monday the 20th at 6:30pm! Powered by Eventbrite

by Terry Runner at May 29, 2017 10:00 AM

May 24, 2017

CrashSpace

Urban Neighbors: The Biodiversity of Urban Los Angeles: Watch Online!

This event was a part of the Civic Engagement Survival Guide: a series of free talks and workshops focused on creating a community that is informed, organized, and engaged.

Samantha Sullivan is a graduate student in pursuit of a Masters in Biology with an emphasis in wildlife conservation. Currently, she works with communities both locally and internationally on assessing barriers and collaborating with locals and conservation organizations in the region to create solutions that work toward coexistence between wildlife and the community. Recently, Samantha came to speak at CRASH Space to educate our community about how we can protect our local wildlife.

If you’re interested in conservation, Samantha also provided us with a useful list of links to the initiatives, organizations, and resources she mentioned in her talk:

You can learn more about Samantha through her website, www.openspacescoalition.com. Watch past videos or view upcoming events on the Civic Engagement Survival Guide.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at May 24, 2017 02:47 AM

May 21, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Bronze Casting!!!!!!

As you may have noticed, the Small Metals area has moved to where hot metals used to live. The process has been gradual but successful. We conducted an experiment over the weekend involving plaster investment and molten bronze. There were many variables in this process including new-to-the-space machinery: the kiln, the electric melting furnace, and the vacuum investment table. As well as different materials used, possibly expired flux, a new kind of plaster, and a type of bronze that had been melted a number of times before. All in all it was a great success. Here is a brief overview along with some photos to enjoy.

Seen here is the kiln at a glowing red temperature of 1,500 degrees. The molten bronze getting ready for the pour. Also seen in this picture is the vacuum table for the cast to help pull the metal through the investment.

The Termolyne mini melt electric melting furnace! Bronze has a melting point of 1,742 degrees 

The pour!

 

Fresh out of the pickle!

Finished rings! All of them (except the black stone in the middle) were cast at PS:One.

-Ella Gentz

The post Bronze Casting!!!!!! appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by ellagentz at May 21, 2017 11:23 PM

May 16, 2017

NYC Resistor

Visitor projects: the most excellent blanket

Hey NYCR visitors – have you done something neat lately? Let us know, so we can blog about it!

Julia learned to knit in December at NYC Resistor. And then, uh….this blanket happened. Julia, you’re amazing. Students outshining their teachers, etc.

I can vouch for this blanket being extremely cozy. You’re looking at 30 skeins (6,540 yards!) of yarn and 1,040 tails that needed weaving in. It comfortably fits three people.

If you want to make your own blanket, the Infinite Rainbow Throw pattern is free from KnitPicks.

Don’t know how to knit? Wish you had more knitting time? Join us every other Monday for our Knit Knight, 730pm-930pm. We’ll teach you – beginners get their first pair of needles free. (You don’t need to be as intense as Julia in order to attend Knit Knight, we promise.)

by Bonnie Eisenman at May 16, 2017 02:22 PM

May 15, 2017

LVL1

Absolute Beginners Computer Programming Class

Monday, May 15th from 7-9 pm in the LVL1 Classroom. We will be learning to program using the free KhanAcademy programming tutorials that are online. This class will be teaching the “processing” computer language which is very similar to C, javascript and the Arduino code. You could just go through the tutorials online by yourself, […]

by Jessica Elle at May 15, 2017 02:12 PM

May 13, 2017

NYC Resistor

May 11, 2017

LVL1

Bob Ross Hack-A-Thon

Bob Ross and chill with the LVL1 crew on Friday, May 12th from 7 pm onwards. Our weekly movie night will consist of Bob Ross painting episodes on the big screen along with free pizza, friends, and fun. There will be prizes for the happiest trees, the saddest trees, the hackiest trees, and the OMG […]

by Jessica Elle at May 11, 2017 08:13 PM