Earth is the Hackerspaces Planet

July 20, 2017

CrashSpace

On Cats and Typing: An Intersection of Machine Learning and Robotics

Guest speaker Elecia White will describe the twists and turns on the path to making a voice-controlled typing robot for her own education and amusement. She’ll show a slightly scary demo of the state-of-the-art machine learning platform then describe the applications of machine learning to robotics (and some of the steps necessary to do so). She will discuss the architecture of her system in its current and plans for the future. Finally, she will demonstrate control of a small, affordable robot arm.

Follow Elecia’s adventures in the worlds of machine learning and robotics.

Elecia White is the host of the Embedded.FM podcast, author of O’Reilly’s Making Embedded Systems, and founder of Logical Elegance, an embedded systems consulting company.

When: July 19th, 8pm
Where: Crashspace!
Cost: FREE
Other: There will be some sort of pastry or baked goods!

Edit: Here are the show notes. Thanks Elecia for the talk and thanks everyone for joining us at Crash!

Typing cats care of Giphy and does not represent any material expected in the talk.

by Kevin at July 20, 2017 03:42 AM

July 18, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 18 July 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn

Where do you scan for news?

Today’s sweep was attacked, killed and dragged back to his fortress by the fellow in the picture above. The internet has won. We (Tod and I) have a cat.

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at July 18, 2017 11:29 PM

NYC Resistor

Learn to Solder on July 23rd

Our next soldering class will be July 23rd. We’ll be teaching through-hole soldering and desoldering, and give you plenty of chance to practice as you make an LED tile.

by Bonnie Eisenman at July 18, 2017 02:29 PM

July 17, 2017

NYC Resistor

DIY Smart Lamp with ESP8266 & Amazon Echo

I upgraded a cool vintage lamp to work with voice commands through my Amazon Echo using an ESP8266 microcontroller and relay circuit. The fauxmoESP Arduino library is what does the heavy lifting in this project; it emulates a Belkin WeMo device, so the Alexa app setup is exactly the same as the store-bought device. I hollowed out the wooden base of the lamp to enclose the electronics, and installed a power override switch that controls the light independently of the voice commands. The full tutorial is on Instructables, and I talk through the code in the video.

Wanna get started with Arduino? Sign up for our September 16 class: Intro to Arduino: Sensors and Input/Output

by Becky Stern at July 17, 2017 03:17 PM

July 14, 2017

NYC Resistor

Our elevator is broken :(

PSA to Craft Night guests: our elevator is not working tonight. Apologies to anyone who needs it.

by Bonnie Eisenman at July 14, 2017 12:23 AM

July 13, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Shine on You Crazy KiCAD — and Other Tales from Chris Gammell

Chris GammellOn Monday July 17th, NERP will host Chris Gammell. Chris is an analog electrical engineer and product manager. He may be known to some of you as co-host of The Amp Hour, and as the charter member of Contextual Electronics. CE offers subscription based electronics courses with different levels of project-oriented learning and personal interaction with an instructor. The Amp Hour is a non-scripted off-the-cuff format show that usually airs every Thursday evening US time. It is the worlds largest and most respected electronics oriented radio show. Discussions range from hobbyist electronics to the state of the electronics industry, components, circuit design, and general on and off-topic rants.

At the NERP on Monday, Chris will present a free rendition of  the Contextual Electronics course titled Shine On You Crazy KiCad. NERP has talked about the open source electronic design program called KiCAD before, but this presentation is different. It’s designed for simplicity and fast execution to give a quick win for new users who follow along on their own laptops. The course is designed as an end-to-end art-to-part experience using KiCAD.  amphour logoWhen I say quick, I mean just 20 minutes start to finish to draw an electronic schematic and then translate the schematic into a printed circuit board PCB layout. (It’s possible to spend lots of days working on a complex circuit board design…) After that, the last step in the process will be for everybody who’s following along to pack up their KiCAD PCB layout files and send them off to OSH Park to actually be made into atoms and snail-mailed back to you. Chris’s demo board is a small, but useful add-on for a Raspberry Pi. The PCB is about 1″ square, so the cost at OSH Park is very small.

made with kicadEven if you don’t plan on actually making the circuit, go ahead and load up a copy of KiCAD  http://kicad-pcb.org/download/ so you can at least have a look and ask questions. It’s open source and free. Win, Mac, & Linux. Kicad is a pretty piece of software in my opinion, and I have a few good reasons for preferring it to Eagle (KiCAD’s freemium competitor).

Chris tells me there’s one thing that NERP might be able to help him with. Contextual Electronics is getting a new course for “absolute beginners” in electronics. This would be along the lines of “what do you need to know about electronics before even thinking of a course like CE”. When you first encounter a subject as broad and deep as electronics, it’s very hard to sort out the signal from the noise. You can spend a lot of effort on something that doesn’t matter while at the same time missing some small Rosetta stone or simple concept that’s perhaps in easy reach. conceptual electronics logoAfter we move past those first trembling steps, we can forget what it was like just building a knowledge framework. To make the best connections with absolute beginners, Chris wants to hear about your conceptual roadblocks or things you wish you’d known from long (or not so long) ago, and how they resolved (or didn’t resolve) themselves. I’m sure he’ll be happy to talk about it at NERP, but consider signing up for CE and visit the Building an absolute beginner course page and add your thoughts.

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

www.meetup.com /NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/­
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/­

Tags: Beagle Bone,electronics,embedded,hackerspace,NERP,Open Source,Pumping Station: One,raspberry pi,OSH Park,The Amp Hour,Contextual Electronics

The post Shine on You Crazy KiCAD — and Other Tales from Chris Gammell appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by edbennett at July 13, 2017 05:12 PM

July 12, 2017

CrashSpace

Net Neutrality Day of Action 2017

Today’s the day folks! Once again, the FCC has targeted Net Nuetrality. Today’s the day to speak your mind, if you haven’t already.

by carlyn at July 12, 2017 08:11 PM

Tuesday Sweep: 11 July 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn: Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

  • Eirik Brandal makes instruments from structural circuits. Wow. So cool, with an aesthetic that reminds me of Duchamp a little.  Watch the video (via BoingBoing again!)
  • EFF “Who has your back?” List is out for 2017. This annual list reviews several large companies based on each company’s policies on how, when and whether to comply with government data request.  A shout out to the companies that aced this particular test:  Adobe, Credo, Dropbox, Lyft, Pinterest, Sonic, Uber, Wickr, and WordPress. I highly recommend not just scanning the pretty chart, but reading at least the executive summary as well.
  • Want to perform a billion billion calculations per second? Then you want an exscale super computer. The US has just gotten serious about being first again. The New Yorker, of all places, had an interesting discussion about what massive computing power means in the cryptoworld using Quantum Computing as the bugbear. TL;DR? IEEE puts it in the headline “Quantum Computer Comes Closer to Cracking RSA Encryption,” but I like the Quartz media article better because it quotes Poe.
  • Speaking of an Arms Race. I’ll admit I’ve been low level freaking out ever since I watched Adobe unveiled VoCo by making Keegan-Michael Key’s voice talk about making out with Jordan Peele. I’m glad that the folks at Wired have given themselves leave to freaked out the potential for forgeries, (via Schneier) too. If fake news is bad now… WHEW. We’re in for it. Time to update all those guides on how to assess a primary source… That said, humanity did live in a time BEFORE video was widely available, and this time it wasn’t that long ago. We can at least forward to the increased quality in video/AR games.
  • I missed writing much about NotPetya, and its motives, but apparently, once again, it could have been avoided by keeping updated. That said, many firms have legacy software they’ve custom rolled at great expense and honestly don’t know what the consequences will be for updating. If this is you or someone you love, try out Wine “a compatibility layer capable of running Windows applications on several POSIX-compliant operating systems”. In other words, you can run .exe files directly without launching an emulator. If your CXO’s like paying for things try the commercial version CrossOver which purportedly takes the some of the pain out of the equation of configuring Wine correctly. You can keep your Linux up-to-date without harming the ability to keep running the old software running on that old hardware.
  • This all said, Jake Williams had an excellent point in the SANS Newsletter 54  “Infosec basics like principles of least privilege would have done more to protect networks [from NotPetya]more than disabling SMB1.”  That Phrase “Least Privlege” was coined in a 1975 paper by J.H. Saltzer and M.D. Schroeder called  ‘Basic Principles of Information Protection’  I’m squarly in the camp that security is a process, not a product, and discussions of technologies should not be at the exclusion of design patterns. So I’m just going to leave some links here, partially for my own reference.

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at July 12, 2017 01:14 AM

July 06, 2017

Nottinghack

Introduction to Arduino Workshop on Saturday, 2nd September

Nottingham Hackspace will be hosting an all-day Introduction to Arduino Workshop, run by James Fowkes and Ian Dickinson, on Saturday, 2nd September.

The Arduino system is a microcontroller board and software designed for extreme ease-of-use and learning, and has been wildly successful all over the world – not just in electronics, but for all sorts of maker projects. If you want to learn how to incorporate electronic control into your projects, this is definitely the workshop for you.

This workshop will cover:

  • What an Arduino is, and how to program it
  • Components and tools
  • Basics of electronics (voltage, current, resistance, etc.)
  • Arduino input and outputs
  • Controlling high-power components
  • Analog output
  • And more!

Aimed for complete beginners, this workshop doesn’t require you to have written a single line of code, switched on a soldering iron or even own an Arduino to take part. All the electronics equipment, including Arduino boards, will be provided on the day, but you will need to bring a laptop to program the Arduino with. It would also help if you installed the Arduino software onto your laptop before the workshop.

This workshop will run from 11am to 4pm, with a break for lunch at 1pm, and will cost £25, which includes use of all tools, boards and components, and free tea or coffee.

Arduino Unos will be available to purchase for £18 and Arduino Starter Kits will be available to purchase for £35. Please bring cash if you would like to buy either of these.

You can purchase your tickets now at EventBrite. This is a very popular workshop, so please buy your tickets early to avoid disappointment.

by Kate at July 06, 2017 08:00 AM

July 05, 2017

Pumping Station: One

How to make a ring out of scrap copper.

IMG_20170702_165616661

I found a piece of scrap copper pipe and decided to make a ring out of it.

Note: This article has also been posted on the NineWaysToLife blog. All the media included is personal. I am a member of PS:One and made this project on its premises. 

IMG_20170702_165630513

I sawed the copper pipe into a width that I thought would work well for a ring. Don’t forget that the ring will widen a bit when you will hammer it out later.

I used a file and some rough-grit sandpaper on the sawed edge of the ring in order to ensure that the edge was straight.

IMG_20170702_174146796

I then performed the annealing process with an acetylene torch. Heat the copper up until it is cherry-red-hot. Immediately quench the red-hot copper in a container of water. The sooner it is quenched the better.

The annealing process is an important step and changes the molecular structure of the copper. This change reduces the hardness of the copper and causes it to be more easily worked. It also reduces the chances for the metal to crack while being worked upon.

The softening of the metal’s crystalline structure by annealing is not reversed by time or temperature but is only reversed by working on the metal. This reverting of the metal back to its original state due to the stresses placed upon it by the work you perform is called “work hardening”.

Due to the work hardening (caused by the hammering, as will be seen below), I needed to anneal an additional time during my crafting process.

IMG_20170702_174320698

The next step in the process directly after annealing is “pickling”. The “Pickle” is an acid bath that removes the layer of copper oxide and that forms on the copper ring from the heat during the annealing process.

Fun Science Fact: No ferrous metals are allowed in the pickle as that reverses the stripping effect that the pickle has on the copper that you placed in it. Allowing steel or iron into the pickle will cause the copper molecules to bind to whatever you later place in the pickle, instead of removing the stains or impurities. This can be very frustrating, especially for people working with non-copper metals such as silver. Nobody wants a copper-covered piece of silver!

Note: On my first unsupervised pickling I made a mistake and used a pair of steel tongs, that someone had left near the pickle area, to remove my ring from the pickle. That mistake required me to neutralize the acid in the pickle to a pH level of 7 (neither acid nor base) by adding baking soda to the acid bath until it stopped reacting and then flushing it down the sink. I then made a new pickle, much to the delight of my fellow craftsmen, since that obviated them doing the work themselves (I have a hunch that someone planted that pair of tongs to get me to change the pickle… I’m just kidding, I was happy to learn!).

IMG_20170702_180412021

Now that the metal was nicely softened up by the annealing process it was time to work it. I measured my finger size on our ring sizer and determined that my pinky was a size 6.5 – 7. Since the original size of the copper ring was about a 4, I needed to expand it. I expanded the ring by using a hammer (with a shiny head surface since shiny heads transfer their shine to the object being hit, in this case, my ring. Scratched up heads transfer those scratches to the object which is a good reason to be careful with your jewelry hammers.) and a ring mandrel (a tapered piece of metal that has ring sizes marked on the side). I beat the ring until it reached the size that I required, remembering to flip the ring every once in a while in order to achieve a uniform spread. Remember, as mentioned above, the metal will thin and spread a little during this step of the process.

The shiny head on my hammer created this beautiful beaten-metal pattern on the ring which I really enjoyed. I hope to use that gorgeous pattern in further pieces.

IMG_20170702_183507519

Now, most of the difficult work has been accomplished and all that is left is the embellishment and design. I experimented with a piece of scrap copper (above) and a selection of chasing punches to find a pattern I enjoyed. (Note the chasing hammer and its dirty and scratched head in stark contrast to my earlier admonition to keep the heads of jewelry hammers smooth and shiny. Chasing hammers are the one exception to that rule as they are used to hammer on metal tools and utensils like chasing punches and dapping punches and never comes in direct contact with the actual metal being worked on.)

I found this pattern to be one that I enjoyed and hammered it into my ring while it was seated on the previously mentioned ring mandrel.

IMG_20170702_201621662

I then took the nearly finished ring and sanded the edges and inside with fine-grit sandpaper.

(Notice how the marks from the chasing punches are barely noticeable? Let’s move on to the next and final step in this process in order to remedy that.)

IMG_20170702_203931816

I then submerged the ring in a solution of hot water and liver of sulfur (and no, that is not a witches brew, rather a chemical mixture). This darkens the metal and adds a patina. I can choose to what extent the metal darkens by how long I keep the ring immersed in the liver of sulfur and how much I buff it (Scotch-Brite is the preferred tool for buffing).

IMG_20170702_205104401

Ta Da! The One Ring has been reforged! Now, all must tremble befor…. I mean, how neat is this ring that I made!? Now, you can make one too! (With access to high-powered heating tools, specialized jewelry-making equipment, chemicals with funny sounding names, and an awesome Pandora playlist, that is.)

Note: Notice the impressions made by the chasing punch are now much more vivid. That is due to the darkening of the metal by the liver of sulfur and the subsequent removal of much of it from the surface of the ring, but not from within the impressions themselves. This creates a lighter/darker effect which gives the impressions much more depth, perspective, and a greater contrast.

How did you enjoy this project? What did you learn from it? Has it inspired you to go out and make something? Please let me know in the comments below.

Note: A special thank you goes to Aushra Abouzeid for painstakingly stepping me through this project and for her wonderful patience in explaining how not to blow myself up with the acetylene torch as well as how to refresh the pickle (which I managed to ruin almost immediately after her back was turned, obviously).

-Baka

The post How to make a ring out of scrap copper. appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by baka at July 05, 2017 03:52 PM

July 04, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 4 July 2017

Happy 4th of July! Hey, USA! We’re in serious need of some family counseling, but you’re worth the trouble. Democracy matters. Happy Birthday.

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment.

If you have the day off an no plan until this evening… good chance to make some updates!

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn: Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

I <3 Fireworks so we’re going to have a fireworks themed post today.

On the history of fireworks I’m turning to the Smithsonian, an amazing American institution that I am very grateful for. Finally established by congress in 1846,  Smithsonian’s call to action for the US was to create as “an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge.” I like the sounds of that. If you do to, call your congressional representatives on Wednesday to let them know.

For videos on on how Fireworks work or are made

Stay safe and enjoy!

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at July 04, 2017 05:13 PM

June 27, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 27 June 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • App and Password Gardening: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it. If you’re keeping it, can you move the password to your password manager (delete it from everywhere else) and add two factor authorization?
  • Move to offline archive & delete your histories where you can find them.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Learn: Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at June 27, 2017 10:01 PM

June 26, 2017

LVL1

Fidget Spinner

Gary’s Fidget Spinner made HackADay! Fidget-Spinning Robot Out-Uselesses Other Useless Machines

by brian at June 26, 2017 11:20 AM

June 21, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 20 June 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • Reduce your attack surface: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it.
  • Anywhere you could add two factor authorization? While you’re at it, move the password to your password manager… and delete it from everywhere else.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Excerpt from SANS Newsletter:

Stack Clash Vulnerability
(June 19, 2017)
A memory management vulnerability affecting a number of open source operating systems (OSes), including Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSDm FreeBSD, and, and amd64, could be exploited to corrupt memory and allow arbitrary code execution. Dubbed Stack Clash, the flaw was discovered by researchers at Qualys. Patches for seven known affected OSes have been released and users are urged to upgrade as soon as possible. Other OSes may be affected as well.
Read more in:
– https://threatpost.com: Stack Clash Vulnerability in Linux, BSD Systems Enables Root Access
– https://arstechnica.com: Serious privilege escalation bug in Unix OSes imperils servers everywhere
– https://www.scmagazine.com: Stack Clash exploits spotted in Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD and Solaris
– https://blog.qualys.com: The Stack Clash

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at June 21, 2017 12:26 AM

June 20, 2017

LVL1

June 18, 2017

Pumping Station: One

NERP Can Reflow, and So Can You! [6-19, 7pm]

Surface Mount Technology is not a new thing. Eventually it’ll be the only thing because new MOSFETS, chips, and computer-on-modules are pretty much all SMT. If you’ve never  soldered SMT parts, you might be surprised at how easy it can be. In fairness, parts below a certain size can be challenging to solder, but with practice you can start big and go smaller and smaller as you get better. But where to start? At NERP on Monday, June 19th Drew Fustini will give a gentle introduction to SMT soldering.

Drew will be building   I can reflow! Badge  and showing the SMD Challenge board, also called the Unfortunate board because the 0201 resistor and LED will unfortunately make you nuts trying to solder them. The boards were made by , a commercial prototype and open source hardware board house. They have a huge catalog of boards designated as shared projects by their customers. You can buy those boards, or design your own in KiCAD or Eagle, and share them if you like.

Drew has a few extra reflow Badge boards if anyone wants to follow along. We’ll try to get enough parts together to fill the boards. Those parts are:

  • Q1 & Q2 – MMBT3904
  • R1 & R2 – 0805 100Ω
  • R3 & R4 – 0805 100kΩ
  • C1 & C2 – 0805 10µF

And two 0805 LEDs and a CR1220 battery clip.

Schematic diagram in Hackaday’s coverage of the I Can Reflow Merit Badge
NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/­
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/­

The post NERP Can Reflow, and So Can You! [6-19, 7pm] appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by edbennett at June 18, 2017 12:35 AM

June 14, 2017

NYC Resistor

Visitor project: Dominion storage solution

Dominion is an award-winning deck-building card game that has ten expansions released as of this writing. There are a wide variety of proposed storage solutions to the problem of toting about several thousand cards and sundry mats and tokens, and Sherwin decided it was high time he moved on up from the method he had been using to a proper receptacle.

First, a look at the final product:

Wooden box sitting on its edge with the word  Open wooden box displaying contents consisting of rows of Dominion cards separated by labeled dividers.


We managed to fit about 3700 unsleeved cards along with the other odds and ends in with room for further expansion. The dividers make every card easy to locate and access, and the box dimensions keep the whole package relatively compact and portable.

Our starting point was an ad-hoc solution that involved storing each set of Kingdom cards in separate pockets on 9-card sheets, with the base cards being held in deck boxes and the tokens in a bead container, all of which were piled into one of the original game boxes and wrapped in a tote bag. This system worked for a time, but as further expansions were released, both box and tote showed increased signs of strain, neither having been designed to hold more than one game or expansion at a time.

Old, beaten Dominion Intrigue box sitting on a wooden table, overflowing with sleeved dominion cards. To its left sits a threadbare Dominion tote bag.

The sheets can be seen overflowing from the game box, which barely squeezed into the tote

The box had already been replaced once before, and when the replacement itself began showing severe signs of wear we began looking into other options. We debated building one out of lumber, but eventually settled on using a case that had been tried and tested in other storage solutions for our first attempt.

We knew that we would require some sort of organizer to keep each column of cards in line, and laser-cut some test pieces out of cardboard to check the fit.

White paper sitting on a mac laptop keyboard with seemingly random numbers and lines scribbled in blue pen. White paper fills the page. In black pen, there are lines an measurements scrawled over the page. In the upper left sits the bottom half of a pencil and a set of mechanical calipers.

Determining the dimensions of the caddy and how to fasten them

Seen from above, the right half of a wooden table is covered in two disjoint halves of a wooden box, the left is covered in white paper. Strewn over everything is a set of cardboard inserts which are white on one face and brown on the other. Wooden box with cardboard inserts fills the page. There one small stack of Dominion cards sitting in each of the six columns.

Assembling the mock caddy, then testing the fit of the cards
We also planned to engrave the game’s logo onto the box using the laser cutter, and had two waxes and two stains we wanted to try. The case came with a tray insert that was made of the same wood, though unfinished, so we did a test burn both before and after applying the four coats to observe the effect. We also removed the hardware from the case and sanded off the veneer in preparation.

Strip of birch plywood with two blury laser etched dominion logos filling it's length runs across the center of the picture. Behind it is the metal latice of a laser cutter. Wooden rectangle sites atop white paper. The words

Mocking up the logo and testing burn parameters for the wood

Blue nitrile gloved hands which come from the right side of the frame are rubbing dark wax into one of four rows on a wood box which sits on white paper. Wooden box with the words

Applying the coats of wax and stain to the test piece
The logo we used had too much background and shading for a clean burn. We ended up using Pawel Pawlak’s Dominion icons to generate an appropriate vector image of the logo and banner outline for the laser cutter.

Sheet of white cardboard on a metal grate in a laser cutter behind dirty glass. There is a blur of a moving laser cutter head over the center third of the cardboard. The beginning of an etching of the Dominion logo can be seen as a pale brown on the cardboard's surface. Sheet of white cardboard on a metal grate in a laser cutter behind dirty glass. There is a blur of a moving laser cutter head over the center third of the cardboard. A completed etching of the Dominion logo can be seen as a pale brown on the cardboard's surface.

Testing the final logo
After finalizing the dimensions of the caddy pieces and wax choice, we then cut the pieces out of clear acrylic, assembled and affixed them with acrylic glue, burned the logo into the case cover, then applied the coats of wax.

Corner of a light brown wooden box fix the lower two thirds of the frame. A sheet of clear acrylic, the height of the box, cuts a single internal column on the left hand side. Light wooden box sits atop white paper at a slight angle filling the upper two thirds of the frame. The box is divided into six columns by strips of clear acrylic which are the same height as the box itself. An additional strip of clear acrylic rests atop the left edge of the box hanging prosperously over the side.

Assembling and checking the fit of the final caddy
Light brown wooden box sits in middle frame at a slight angle atop white paper. It is mostly covered in a honey brown wax. The Dominion logo is etched in its center. Two hands connected to arms which lead off the top of the picture, are wearing blue nitirle gloves and rubbing additional wax into the surface.

Applying the wax to the case exterior

To minimize cards sliding around and give them a cushion, we cut a segment out of poker felt and glued it to the bottom with spray adhesive. We attempted to replace the stock hardware with sturdier options, but found the wood to be too thin to support any of the screws from the cabinet fixtures.

A rectangular wooden pallet has two small squares of green felt glued to the bottom right corner of the palette. A jug of wood glue, can of spray adhesive, and hand holding a hot glue gun are just out of frame. Light wooden box with a green felt base rests on its edge, filling the frame. The box's inside is divided into six vertical columns by clear acrylic. Two hands in the upper right of the frame can barely be seen screwing something into its side.

Testing different adhesives on felt samples and reattaching the hardware to the finished bottom
Finally, after completing assembly of the box, we had to transfer the actual game components from the old box to the new one. We created the divider tabs using sumpfork’s Dominion Divider Generator and had them printed on cardstock and trimmed at a local print shop.

Warm brown wooden box sits in the middle of the frame at an angle resting on butcher paper on a wodden table. The Domnion logo is etched in its center. Brass clasps are affixed to its front along with a leather and brass handle. Open light brown wooden box resting on butcher paper on a wooden table. The bottom of the box is green felt and it is divided into six columns by clear acrylic strips.

The finished box ready to receive the game materials

Resting atop a wooden table which fills the frame, from left to right there is a stack of two sheets of card sleeves full of Dominon cards, the bottom half of a Dominion box full of card sheets which are them selves full of Dominion cards, the top half of a Dominion box with three stacks of dominion cards, a light wooden box which is open, with a green felt bottom split into six columns by strips of clear acrylic, one of the columns is full of dominion cards with a second one about half full, and finally five stacks of white card paper which are barely in frame. On the right side of the table there is also a jumble of empty card sleeves. A wooden table runs at a sharp angle from the top left to the bottom right of the frame. From left to right there are: sheets of card sleeves full of dominion cards, the bottom half of a dominion box half full of full card sheets, the top half of a dominion box with three stacks of dominion cards in it, a light wooden box which is open, its base green felt, divided into six columns by clear acrylic the left most of which is full of dominion cards and dividers, finally six stacks of white card stock with dominion rules text printed on them.

Moving the cards into their new home
A light wooden box sits dead center, filling the bottom half of the frame. Its open lid fills the top half. The box is filled with dominion cards arranged in four of the six columns and separated by white card stock with card titles. The second to left column contains little plastic bags of glittering bronze tokens, and the last column is about half full of cards separated in the same manner as the first four.

Ready to play!

by zellio at June 14, 2017 04:36 AM

NYCR Members Kari Love and Matthew Borgatti teaching Soft Robotics and Bioinspiration at ITP Camp

Robots are neat, but everyone has one around the house these days. From Roomba to Alexa, there’s an army of soothing plastic helpers to help you look up actor names and eliminate your least favorite repetitive tasks. Aren’t you curious what is out there chasing the horizon of robotics, on the seam between the artificial and the biological?

Well, that’s what you’re going to learn if you’re one of the lucky ITP Camp attendees this year. Our members Kari Love and Matthew Borgatti will be teaching a class on Soft Robotics and Bioinspiration this week at NYU’s ITP. It will cover how they – real actual researchers in soft robotics – perform research, build prototypes, and solve problems with inspiration from biology. It’s also got hands-on prototyping and playful learning for everyone excited by design and creative process.

From the course description:

Roboticists frequently find inspiration from the incredible evolved forms of nature, and translate them into fresh thinking and solutions. This workshop invites you to explore this fast-growing domain where biology and robotics collide.

by Matthew Borgatti at June 14, 2017 02:08 AM

June 13, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 13 June 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

  • Updated software recently? Pick a new device to check on today.
  • Backups still up and running? When was the last time you made a clean disk image? Here’s a new great article on how to design a backup system.
  • Reduce your attack surface: Delete a low quality app from your phone or delete an account that you don’t need that doesn’t make you happy. Digital cruft builds up. Delete it.
  • Anywhere you could add two factor authorization? While you’re at it, move the password to your password manager… and delete it from everywhere else.
  • Double check privacy settings on your phone, social media accounts. The folks running the companies can change the TOS and add “features” before you notice them.

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s NOT you that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at June 13, 2017 07:48 PM

YouTube Channel: Computerphile

Channel Name: Computerphile

Channel Address: https://www.youtube.com/user/Computerphile?&ab_channel=Computerphile

Who is it For?: Motivated Beginner to a CS student who needs a refresher or doesn’t like how their prof is explains things.

Why I Like It: The folks behind Computerphile create high quality computer science videos that explain the underlying algorithms and thought processes driving computer technology. Typically lasting around the 10 minutes, if one video seems too advanced chances are good they’ve included links to other videos in the description.

 

Sample Video

by carlyn at June 13, 2017 07:42 PM

June 06, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 6 June 2017

 

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s not YOU that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at June 06, 2017 11:05 PM

June 05, 2017

Pumping Station: One

NERP Tonite: MOSFETs with Ste!

Mosfets – They can be “on” — They can be “off” — They can even be in between! Tonight at NERP, entrepreneur, engineer, and really good teacher Ste Kulov will guide us into the world of mosfets. Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors if you want to impress your friends.

N-Channel MOSFET [wikipedia]

Since mosfets are a wide and deep subject, I asked Ste where he wanted to focus his talk. With great economy of words, he said it better than I could.

“Most of the generic stuff, fairly quickly.  A few simple examples I was probably going to cover are: making a logic inverter, a logic controlled load-switch, and reverse battery protection. Simulating in LTspice [circuit CAD], since I can draw that stuff in two seconds and put it on the screen.  If you want to do a power MOSFET application, I would need to see the datasheet for it.  Also keep in mind that high current stuff is no good for breadboards. If you need a list:  4 vs 3 terminal, body diode, Rds(on), gate drive, switching speed, N-channel, P-channel, CMOS digital logic, CMOS analog switches.”

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at

www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/­
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/­

Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source, raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One

The post NERP Tonite: MOSFETs with Ste! appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by edbennett at June 05, 2017 04:23 PM

June 04, 2017

LVL1

Naval Ordnance Shenanigans

Naval Ordnance is back again! Join us on Saturday, May 20th at 9am to play an exciting game of Naval Ordnance: the bigger and badder cousin of the Battleship game we all know and love. We’ll be setting up the game pool in the parking lot and will start festivities by organizing teams to compete and/or […]

by Jessica Elle at June 04, 2017 01:00 PM

May 30, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Making stuff for scientific conferences

Last year I was making little things for a conference my work organized in Chicago.

You’ll find more info on my blog posts. But as a teaser, it involved laser-cutting, glue, Inkscape and a lot of mistakes (but I didn’t took pictures of those, too bad).

Awards

A person touching a device

Slide Ruler

Circular slide-ruler in acrylic on plywood board.

The post Making stuff for scientific conferences appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by bjonnh at May 30, 2017 10:28 PM

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 30 May 2017

Welcome to your weekly reminder to back up your data, update software and otherwise pay attention to your digital environment. (Oh, and to come to the CRASH Space meeting…)

Jump in Here

  • Welcome. If you haven’t been following along, it’s okay. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are.
  • I highly recommend the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Feeling more ambitious? Review the list of OneThing articles and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

The basics.

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Reflect

Feeling dumb or stupid about how not-l33t you are? Angsting over some silly thing you “know better than to do.” Stop. That isn’t useful. Regret is only of use if it prompts an actual change in behavior. Maybe it’s not YOU that sucks. Could be it’s the technology and you could come up with a fix that would help lots of people. Look forward and make a plan.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at May 30, 2017 07:11 PM

Recording a Variable Strobe Light

Steve and I made a really fun fountain controlled by a bike pump for Maker Faire 2017. It was a huge hit with attendees. Unfortunately, sharing it on social media was a pain:

View post on imgur.com

This is the problem whenever you are trying to record a strobe lit object. Black bars show up on your screen. It’s possible to make them smaller with some settings, but I figured I wanted to make it completely go away. Our fountain has a variable strobe, depending on the bike pump, that makes the problem even harder to sync to.

Luckily, I had an industrial camera with a trigger input.

I was able to sync the trigger output on the 24V line of the fountain directly to the trigger input of the Cognex 2000-130 camera. I’d like to get a higher quality and different lens for this camera, but the basics worked. It showed the image fully.

View post on imgur.com

Final product becomes a nice image with no flickering and no horrible bars. Video. I used CAM Studio to record the screen on Cognex’s InSight Explorer.

If you have a strobe fountain or other effect and want to record decent video without the scan bars or hum bars, this is a possibility. Send the same output from your strobe to your camera and record the video onscreen.

More information about our levitating fountain and check out the HackADay post about it.

by Kevin at May 30, 2017 05:32 PM

May 29, 2017

NYC Resistor

We’re open for Craft Night

Holidays? What holidays! Resistor will be open as usual tonight for Craft Night / Knit Knight.

by Bonnie Eisenman at May 29, 2017 09:56 PM

LVL1

Wood working Class – A foundation Course (cutting boards)

RSVP Link Wood working sessions to teach you everything you need to know to make a cutting board and beyond! Next class is Monday the 20th at 6:30pm! Powered by Eventbrite

by Terry Runner at May 29, 2017 10:00 AM

May 24, 2017

CrashSpace

Urban Neighbors: The Biodiversity of Urban Los Angeles: Watch Online!

This event was a part of the Civic Engagement Survival Guide: a series of free talks and workshops focused on creating a community that is informed, organized, and engaged.

Samantha Sullivan is a graduate student in pursuit of a Masters in Biology with an emphasis in wildlife conservation. Currently, she works with communities both locally and internationally on assessing barriers and collaborating with locals and conservation organizations in the region to create solutions that work toward coexistence between wildlife and the community. Recently, Samantha came to speak at CRASH Space to educate our community about how we can protect our local wildlife.

If you’re interested in conservation, Samantha also provided us with a useful list of links to the initiatives, organizations, and resources she mentioned in her talk:

You can learn more about Samantha through her website, www.openspacescoalition.com. Watch past videos or view upcoming events on the Civic Engagement Survival Guide.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at May 24, 2017 02:47 AM

May 21, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Bronze Casting!!!!!!

As you may have noticed, the Small Metals area has moved to where hot metals used to live. The process has been gradual but successful. We conducted an experiment over the weekend involving plaster investment and molten bronze. There were many variables in this process including new-to-the-space machinery: the kiln, the electric melting furnace, and the vacuum investment table. As well as different materials used, possibly expired flux, a new kind of plaster, and a type of bronze that had been melted a number of times before. All in all it was a great success. Here is a brief overview along with some photos to enjoy.

Seen here is the kiln at a glowing red temperature of 1,500 degrees. The molten bronze getting ready for the pour. Also seen in this picture is the vacuum table for the cast to help pull the metal through the investment.

The Termolyne mini melt electric melting furnace! Bronze has a melting point of 1,742 degrees 

The pour!

 

Fresh out of the pickle!

Finished rings! All of them (except the black stone in the middle) were cast at PS:One.

-Ella Gentz

The post Bronze Casting!!!!!! appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by ellagentz at May 21, 2017 11:23 PM

May 16, 2017

NYC Resistor

Visitor projects: the most excellent blanket

Hey NYCR visitors – have you done something neat lately? Let us know, so we can blog about it!

Julia learned to knit in December at NYC Resistor. And then, uh….this blanket happened. Julia, you’re amazing. Students outshining their teachers, etc.

I can vouch for this blanket being extremely cozy. You’re looking at 30 skeins (6,540 yards!) of yarn and 1,040 tails that needed weaving in. It comfortably fits three people.

If you want to make your own blanket, the Infinite Rainbow Throw pattern is free from KnitPicks.

Don’t know how to knit? Wish you had more knitting time? Join us every other Monday for our Knit Knight, 730pm-930pm. We’ll teach you – beginners get their first pair of needles free. (You don’t need to be as intense as Julia in order to attend Knit Knight, we promise.)

by Bonnie Eisenman at May 16, 2017 02:22 PM

May 15, 2017

LVL1

Absolute Beginners Computer Programming Class

Monday, May 15th from 7-9 pm in the LVL1 Classroom. We will be learning to program using the free KhanAcademy programming tutorials that are online. This class will be teaching the “processing” computer language which is very similar to C, javascript and the Arduino code. You could just go through the tutorials online by yourself, […]

by Jessica Elle at May 15, 2017 02:12 PM

May 13, 2017

NYC Resistor

May 11, 2017

LVL1

Bob Ross Hack-A-Thon

Bob Ross and chill with the LVL1 crew on Friday, May 12th from 7 pm onwards. Our weekly movie night will consist of Bob Ross painting episodes on the big screen along with free pizza, friends, and fun. There will be prizes for the happiest trees, the saddest trees, the hackiest trees, and the OMG […]

by Jessica Elle at May 11, 2017 08:13 PM

May 09, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 9 May 2017

 

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  • NEW: Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at May 09, 2017 09:50 PM

May 08, 2017

NYC Resistor

Interactive Show Preview: Dance Dance Running Man

dancerun

Join the fun at the NYC Resistor Interactive Show this Saturday, where you can play Dance Dance Running Man by Colleen AF Venable, Eric Skiff, and Astrida Valigorsky:

Dance Dance Running Man revives the dance-game classic DDR as dystopian chase game. Keep those feet moving while the chasers chase from behind the arrows and Arnold keeps them at bay. Featuring images from the film and pro-level DDR pads, you’ll be dancing for your life!

Come play with it yourself at The Interactive Show on May 13th! Tickets are just $15 in advance ($20 at the door), and the libations are on us. Get your tickets now!

ezgif-2-857b32491a

by Becky Stern at May 08, 2017 07:27 PM

Interactive Show Preview: Who Do You Love

00004IMG_00004_BURST20170504124126

Come to the NYC Resistor Interactive Show this Saturday to see “Who Do You Love” by Adelle Lin, Olivia Barr, and Matt Pinner:

A deplorable reality television host rises to power by exploit people for the sake of entertainment. He uses a nightmarish cacophony of violence and catch phrases to control his audience. In The Running Man this media mogul shouts, “Who Loves You and Who Do You Love?”

Who Do You Love is an interactive sound installation that samples Donald Trump saying the word “China” in phrases from his campaign and presidency. The interface device for the installation consists of three acrylic towers, dispersed through the space. Each tower houses three buttons where players can activate the sound from different locations. Pressing a button triggers the Commander and Chief to say “china”, “i love china”, “i know china very well”, or “china all the time”.

Burst_Cover_GIF_Action_20170211233509

The phrases overlap each time a button is pushed to create an ambiance of garbled memetastic catch phrases. The towers encase a teensy audio shield, teensy 3.2, xbee, and our custom oshpark pcb. the devices connect to each other using these 900mhz xbee radios and light up clear acrylic portions with led sequins when buttons are pressed anywhere in the space. The new echo of “China” is channeled into the exhibition room’s speakers or through headphones. Multiple players of Who Loves You collaborate to compel the distortion of Trump’s reflections on China into noise.

We hope this raises some discussions about your feelings around entertainment media and representative governments.

More info on Github.

Come play with it yourself at The Interactive Show on May 13th! Tickets are just $15 in advance ($20 at the door), and the libations are on us. Get your tickets now!

by Becky Stern at May 08, 2017 07:24 PM

Pumping Station: One

Turning the Shopbot into a plotter

Former PS:1 president Derek Bever and I were joking in the PS:1 IRC chat room awhile back about using the Shopbot as a tool for uses it was not designed for, and turning it into a plotter seemed especially ridiculous. Since I’d wanted to learn how to use the Clausing lathe, it dawned on me that this ridiculous idea could, in fact, become a terrifying reality. So thanks to Anna Yu who taught me how to use the lathe, I made a bit with an 11mm bore to fit into the 1/2″ collet on the Shoptbot:

Having spent the time to make the part, it seemed silly to stop there, so I realized I’d have to make a post-processor for VCarve and Aspire (Fusion 360 coming soon!). I already had experience with Shopbot’s post-processors, creating a “Always turn spindle off” version of Ryan’s “Always turn spindle on” post processor as well as the XYZ Zero Finder program that works with the XYZ plate made on the Bridgeport. So hunkering down on the computer in the CNC Lounge (where Aspire is installed), I made a “Sharpie Bit” post processor that 1. always turns the spindle off, and 2. always sets Z to 0, regardless of what is done in Aspire or VCarve. This also means you have to explicitly set Z’s 0 position without use of the Z plate as there’s nothing to tell the machine when the ‘bit’ is at the right spot.

The first attempt was made using some cardboard I found in the garbage. This test did not go well because I had set Z to 0 in one corner of the cardboard, but because the cardboard was folded over, it was more puffy in the middle, which means that the Shopbot happily plunged the sharpie into the cardboard. Oops. Try #2 used a piece of acrylic that was laying around and I assumed was garbage, so I used that and the second attempt went much better. Inspired, I grabbed some acrylic from my shelf and made the version below.

I’m going to clean up the code a little (like removing a bunch of debugging stuff, unnecessary pauses, etc.,) and then will run it by Matt (CNC area host) and if he’s cool with it, the bit will go in the drawer and the post processor available to anyone using VCarve and Aspire.

The post Turning the Shopbot into a plotter appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by tachoknight at May 08, 2017 02:48 PM

May 04, 2017

Hive76

Learn CAD at Hive76; Fusion 360 class with Chris Thompson

Make shape with tool

Computer Aided Design is the way we interact with the digital tools that make things. Do you want to try 3D printing or laser cutting? Ever want to CNC mill something from a chunk of aluminum? The first step is getting your idea into the computer.Cross section of CAD model for illustration

Fusion 360 by Autodesk is a powerful parametric CAD tool that is free to use for makers, educators, and even most startups. It rivals SolidWorks in its functionality, but adds features found in many standalone tools. Your instructor Chris Thompson is a certified CAD professional with experience teaching digital making to beginners and professionals alike.

In this class you will learn the basics of most CAD systems and the intricacies of the Fusion 360 interface with hands-on demonstrations. The evening will begin with a general overview of CAD. There will be a structured walk-through of the program where every student creates the same model. This is followed by individual work where students explore the numerous different ways to make any one shape. Do you build up feature-by-feature, or would you rather carve away piece-by-piece? The class will reveal the hidden pitfalls of the program and any caveats. We will cover exporting your files for the next step in making. Any remaining time in the evening will be dedicated to answering any questions you have about CAD or making.

The class is Thursday, June 1 2017 from 7pm – 9pm at Hive76

Tickets are $50 and can be purchased from our ticketleap page. Members, don’t forget your discount!
Students must bring their own laptop with Fusion 360 installed and a 3 button mouse (left, right, scroll wheel button.) Please bring some paper for sketching and notes too.
Students will also need a free Autodesk account to save their work. Please follow these instructions to get set up with a free account.

by eagleapex at May 04, 2017 01:07 AM

May 02, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 2 May 2017

My heart made that glowstick cracking noise, with the blue sadness leaking out. It made that noise twice on Saturday night. Once when the very nice young woman said she was surprised I was so technical because I seemed so artsty. (I was wearing a scarf?)  The second crunch landed when a different even younger woman agreed that folks are either creative or technical, and, further, she said that she was not creative which is why she’d do just fine in computer science.

My goal for me in this shockingly common situation has always been not to react to the ooze starting to cover my face. The job is to smile, to recruit, to teach about creative coding and STEAM initiatives. The job is to tell these young folks that they don’t have to layer their fantastical dreams away in tissue paper to be engineers or simply to do some engineering.  Even though I know how hard it’s been for me.  It should be easier for them. Please let it be easier for them. Please help me make it easier for them.

I need even more evidence, so this Tuesday Sweep I’d like to make a request. I’d like to add a new item to the check list. Please make sure to publish your crazy projects and the things that you’ve learned. Even if they seem little and stupid. Especially if they seem little and stupid.  If you’re a member do it here. Do it on hackaday.io. Put it on instructables, your own site. Also especially on places where the someone might randomly run into it. Instagram, Youtube, where ever. Publish. Publish. Publish. Wear your projects on you back pack.  Put them up in your cubicle. Carry them around on your phone. Print out a function you’re particularly proud of on archival paper and frame that sucker up.  There is a whole new generation with the exact same hang ups as before. STILL! We must show them!

The technical is creative and the creative is technical.  If any city in the world can show that off, it’s us here in LA. We know this message here at CRASH Space. Let’s show it!

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  • NEW: Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at May 02, 2017 08:05 PM

April 28, 2017

NYC Resistor

Interactive Show Preview: Panorama Lamp

Here’s another Interactive Show preview, this time of “Panorama Lamp” by Kirill Shevyakov, Alexander Savvy, and Paul Koch. Check it out in action in this video.

Panorama Lamp Panaorama Lamp panorama lamp video

The Panorama lamp is a tribute to a monumental Soviet architecture. Inspired by a colossal concrete curves and extraordinary aesthetic of USSR structures this lamp is a miniature replica of a soviet movie theatre. The surface of the lamp is divided into 70 units creating a 360 degree visual grid. Each unit encompasses an LED which forms a vast “canvas” for various interactions, light sequences, and data visualizations.

Come play with it yourself at The Interactive Show on May 13th! Tickets are just $15 in advance ($20 at the door), and the libations are on us. Get your tickets now!

by potatono at April 28, 2017 03:21 PM

April 26, 2017

NYC Resistor

Interactive Show Preview: Red Rider

Time has been flying and we’ve been frantically getting ready for The Interactive Show. It’s just 17 days away! Here’s a preview of “Red Rider” by Ranjit Bhatnagar and Colleen AF Venable.

-1

Red Rider

A modern take on Little Red Riding Hood with a NYC twist. The story is told in six voices, each giving their version of what happened—including Red Rider (the fastest bike messenger in the city), the now-vegan Wolf, the Lumberjock (who always gives 110%), three very bizarre little pigs, and a maybe-not-so-sweet-and-innocent Grandma. Find the six listening stations and see if you can you figure out what happened to the Wolf.

Tickets are just $15 in advance, and the libations are on us. Get your tickets now!

There’s still time to submit a project before the May 1st deadline, contact us!

by potatono at April 26, 2017 03:14 PM

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 25 April 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

  • Disney Land’s Space Mountain will be returned to it’s classic theme starting June 1 after doing some Star Wars Cos Play for the past couple of years. This year marks the ride’s 40th anniversary as well as the anniversary of Star Wars A New Hope coming up on May 25th.(via curbed)
  • Call your congress people, notify the DHS – We must not require passwords at the border!
  • When can you see “apple.com” in the URL bar of your browser and have it not be “apple.com”? When its some other crazy unicode URL that gets rendered as “apple.com” for …reasons? If you type the URL directly, there should be no problem. What I love about it, is this URL bar hijacking exploit provides a wonderful excuse to remind yourself or learn how a numeric based system like computers can display words and letters at all. Watch Computerphile’s “Characters, Symbols and the Unicode Miracle.”
  • Carnegie Mellon University has released a comprehensive list of C++ secure-coding best practices. via Schneier
  • For me, sustainable processes allow better long term planning and therefore security.  Right on time for Earth Day last week Apple announced its aim to develop a “closed loop supply chain” that uses no newly mined materials.  (also via Ars Technica.)
  • I have no military background. I was unfamiliar until today with the phrase “kill chain,” which apparently simply means the chain of events that needs happen for a target to be destroyed. It’s a bit emo as a phrase, but it is useful as a concept. If you happen to be on defense, like any of us with computers on the internet are, your job is to disrupt that chain anywhere you can because destroying even just one link will wreck the plans of bad actors poking around on your network.  This phrase caught my eye was all tangled up with one of the buzz phrases I keep an eye out for, “Internet of Things,” in an article where author thinly rehashed a Lockheed Martin (now Leidos) white paper.  A better introduction would be the talk Marissa Kimball of Palantir gave at GovCon 2013: “Up Against APT: Dissecting the Kill Chain” which breaks this subject down well. This line of searching lead me also to thephrase “Anomaly Detection” and Elizabeth (Betsy) Nichols Ph.D. excellent “Anomaly Detection 101” talk as well.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at April 26, 2017 12:14 AM

April 20, 2017

Hackspace Manchester

April 19, 2017

KwartzLab Makerspace

Repair Cafe this Sunday!

Repair Cafe

It’s that time again for another Repair Cafe! In partnership with TransitionKW, we’re hosting another event this Sunday, April 23rd from noon until 4pm.

DON’T THROW YOUR BROKEN STUFF AWAY! Bring in your busted items and we’ll try and help you fix it (FOR FREE)! In the past we’ve done electronics, appliances, furniture, toys, clothing and more. Free coffee and munchies will be provided!

Register for Repairs!

If you’ve got something you’d like us to have a look at, please fill out a reservation using the Eventbrite link below:

RESERVE YOUR REPAIR SLOT

By registering ahead of time, we can ensure someone will be on hand to help you with your item!

See you there!

The post Repair Cafe this Sunday! appeared first on KwartzLab Makerspace.

by Ben at April 19, 2017 05:55 PM

April 14, 2017

NYC Resistor

April 22nd: All-Day CryptoParty

Photo by Huck Magazine.

Photo by Huck Magazine.

CryptoParty returns to NYC Resistor on April 22nd, 2017 for a night of learning about your digital defense in the age of mass surveillance from Fort Meade and Madison Ave. Stop by anytime between 3PM and 9PM and enjoy snacks and skills from a variety of online security practitioners and researchers. We’re hosting a full day mix of and hands-on-help with everything from vetting a good VPN to navigating Tor and Signal.

If you’ve never been to Resistor before, check our Participate page for more info, including the Code of Conduct. Hope to see you there! If you’ve never been a CryptoParty before, please check out the CryptoParty Guiding Principles.

When:

Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 3:00PM – 9:00PM.

Where:

NYC Resistor (between Bergen and Dean)
87 3rd Ave. Floor 4 (use this OSM link if you’re Richard Stallman)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

by David Huerta at April 14, 2017 03:00 PM

April 13, 2017

CrashSpace

Representative Town Halls: Make Your Voice Heard!

The House and Senate are in recess, which means it is time for our representatives to come home and meet with their constituents.

Both of our California Senators have town halls coming up. Join us in making our voices heard by showing up in person with your questions ready:

  • Senator Feinstein Town Hall: RSVP REQUIRED. Thurs, Apr 20th @ 11:00AM
  • Senator Harris Town Hall: RSVP REQUIRED. Fri, Apr 21st @ 3:30PM

As for the House, here at CRASH Space our local representative is Congresswoman Bass. She does not currently have a town hall scheduled, but she does have a relevant event:
From Nixon to Trump: Perspectives on Presidential Accountability. Wed, Apr 19th @ 6:30PM

Kudos to Congresswoman Bass for being the only one of our representatives to choose a meeting time that is outside of daytime working hours.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at April 13, 2017 01:46 AM

April 12, 2017

NYC Resistor

Get Your Tickets for the 2017 Interactive Show!

runningman-invite-facebook

We’re just about a month away from the 2017 NYC Resistor Interactive Show on May 13th! This year’s theme is The Running Man. The 80s dystopian future sci-fi takes place in 2017 and has so many great campy elements. Who can resist lo-fi graphics, spandex costumes, hexagonal decode systems, and a villain in LED studded armor? The projects practically create themselves! Got a project you want in the show? Elements from similar 80s flicks like Barb Wire, Cherry 2000 and Max Headroom are also a great idea. Submit your project by May 1st!

Don’t have a project but want to relive the futures of the past in the present! Get your tickets to the show today before they sell out!

When:

Saturday, May 13th, 2017 8:00PM – Late.

Where:

NYC Resistor (between Bergen and Dean)
87 3rd Ave. Floor 4 (use this OSM link if you’re Richard Stallman)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

by David Huerta at April 12, 2017 12:56 AM

April 11, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 11 April 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Topics this week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at April 11, 2017 11:46 PM

April 05, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 4 April 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Only 6 topics this week:

  • Hack-a-Day won April Fools as far as I’m concerned, although the EFF newsletter is a strong runner up.
  • Brilliant idea of the week! Everyone should encrypt their email by knitting their messages into scarves and sending them via snail mail. Kniterate, a digital knitting machine based on OpenKnit, is the project to make it happen. Whose with me? Anyone anyone? Well, the Kickstarter is cool.
  • You know what’s better than this weekly post? SANS newsletters.  The @Risk one last week highlighted the same Ars Technica article on Symantec that I picked out, so I might be a bit biased.  However, for those of you trying to come up with a good recommendation for those who aren’t so tech savvy “OUCH” their newsletter for the common-user might be just the ticket.
  • Issue of the week: Symantec’s Stamp Tramp behavior for issuing https certificates makes them a persona non-gratta with private researchers and Google via Ars Technica (not for the first time)
  • Fresh off the Press from Krebs on Security: The Taylor Huddleston story.  When is a software programmer criminally liable for the behavior of their users?
  • In the don’t freak out, but appreciate how clever the monkeys are category of exploits – Using sound to hijack devices with accelerometers is insane, clever, and how can this be a burning man art project this year???
  • Who knew? The cryptography literature has an extended universe with recurring characters and everything. I’m totally charmed.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at April 05, 2017 06:18 PM

April 03, 2017

NYC Resistor

Interactive Show CFP deadline is May 1st

Projects are starting to roll in for the Interactive Show! We’re going to set a deadline of May 1st for project submissions. If you have something you would like to show off, contact us.

runningman-invite-facebook

by potatono at April 03, 2017 03:17 PM

April 01, 2017

Hackspace Manchester

Sonoff smart wifi switch

Bob found these ESP8266 based Wi-Fi Relays from china, the “Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch For MQTT COAP Smart Home” and being that he is is kind of a geek he bought some, now in typical China fashion the difference between 3 and 5 was not all that much, so he got two extra for me to glance over.

Please remove mains from the unit if you are looking at the unit! this is not a Class II device and 230 VAC is present on both sides of the PCB.

UART pinout

UART pinout

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?fit=229%2C153&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?fit=229%2C153&ssl=1" />

Sonoff is a WiFi wireless switch that can connect to appliance of different types and brands. Sonoff sends data to cloud platform through the WiFi Router, which enables you to remotely control all appliances with the App eWeLink on your smartphone.

The manufactures specification is as such:

  • Voltage range: 90-250v AC(50/60Hz)
  • Max current: 10A
  • Max Wattage: 2200 watts
  • Dimensions: (L)88*(W)38*(H)23mm
  • Color: White
  • Humidity: 5%-95%
  • Wireless Frequency: 2.4Ghz
  • Working Temp: ﹣20℃-75℃

Now the eagle eyed among you will have spotted the lack of CE or FCC marks anywhere on this! a quick look at the user guide also fails to mention any form of compliance.


So without much more waiting around let us have a look at the product.

ESP8266

The ESP8266 module is on the PCB, however does not seem to have any details of an FCC number, so is may not be a pre approved module, however they do make it easy to get to the UART.

Relay

Looking at the main components on the board, the relay shows us that it is part number HRS3FNH-S-DC5V-A

This particular part number does not appear to have an English data sheet available, so lets glance over one in Chinese (using the bits gleaned from Aliexpress for a different model as a reference).

  • HRS3FN – Model
  • H – High Sensitivity 200mW coil.
  • DC5V – Coil Voltage
  • A – Contact form (A or C) this claims that the Contact is rated for 10 A @ 250 VAC.

Mains Connectors

Screw connectors on Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch

There are two 5mm Pitch mains terminals on the PCB, These should be rated to the same or greater current as the box tells me it is rated for, so these should be safe for use with 10 A @ 230 VAC (the box also states 2.2 kW). Breaking out a bit of random scrap mains wire, I am going to make a test probe for these terminals:


Looking at the screw terminals a bit more, they look a lot like these Screw Terminal (5mm) from SparkFun (and other sellers). These screw terminals fail the strand test above, and the data sheet rates them for 8 A…

PCB Board

The layout is nice and tight, but is it too tight! the gap between Live and Neutral is a bit tight, I think it is safe to say that I feel it is a bit too close, The requirement for creepage distance between Live and Neutral before any fusing is a minimum of 2.4mm; there is no fusing on this PCB at all.

Emissions

Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions - Live Side

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions – Live Side

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-L.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-L.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions - Neutral Side

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions – Neutral Side

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-N.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-N.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 30MHz to 1 GHz

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 30MHz to 1 GHz

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RAD.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RAD.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 1GHz to 3 GHz

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 1GHz to 3 GHz

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RADu.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RADu.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />

If you read the post about the HLK-PM01 you will know why I am using BS EN 55032 and not BS EN 55022 (CISPA 32 and CISPA 22), if not, its because BS EN 55022:2010 was Withdrawn on 05 March 2017, and replaced with BS EN 55032:2012, and CISPA 32 doesn’t have quite the same get out clauses as CISPA 22 did:

As we can see from the graphs above, its a fail on Conducted Emissions (Live Side has measurements, neutral didn’t. However they are very smiler). however on the other scans its a pass.

All in all, from a unit point of view, it is an interesting unit that I may be tempted to use (Fused at 5A), HOWEVER it does not meet the requirements of relevant standards, it is not electrically safe. It would be illegal to place this unit as is on the market within the European Union.

If you are making a product that users are required to wire it in or plug in, Please, please send CASS Industries an email to ask about testing!

The test results on this page are indicative, and in no way constitute evidence of a result!

by Skippy at April 01, 2017 10:48 PM

Revisiting the HLK-PM01

A while ago I looked at the HLK-PM01, and amazingly it turned into a very well read post… (do not even touch the cheaper crap!) with a lot of people asking how to make it work properly.

I also got an email from Tom at smart-sense.hr saying that he had used one of the HLK-PM01 modules, and his emission graphs were similar to the ones I produced in the last post. He had also been in contact with people at Hi-Link, the manufacturer who sent him the following solution.

I don’t have any 10 mH chokes (Well I probably do, I just have no idea which ones they are) however I have some 20 mH chokes, and a Schaffner RN102-0.6/02 which is 2 x 4.4 mH chokes in common mode (Farnell number 2097049).

I don’t use Inductors all that much as a component that I spec by value, but on paper Serial and Parallel Inductors behave nicely, so lets have a look at doing that:

 

At work we have two LCR meters, a Wayne Kerr B424/N and an Sourcetronic ST2830 (ST2830 LCR Meter Manual), so setting the RN102-0.6-02 up to each of them in a number of configurations I managed to get some values (easer than the maths, and less likely to be wrong):

RN102-0.6/02 - 2 x 4.4 mH

RN102-0.6/02 – 2 x 4.4 mH

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-15.13.51.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-15.13.51.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wayne Kerr B424/N

Wayne Kerr B424/N

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.37.21.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.37.21.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per A on Table below

Wired as per A on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.32.56.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.32.56.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per B on Table below

Wired as per B on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.34.34.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.34.34.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per C on Table below

Wired as per C on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.35.55.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.35.55.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per D on Table below

Wired as per D on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.28.23.jpg?fit=225%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.28.23.jpg?fit=676%2C901&ssl=1" />
Wired as per E on Table below

Wired as per E on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.29.51.jpg?fit=225%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.29.51.jpg?fit=676%2C901&ssl=1" />
Sourcetronic ST2830

Sourcetronic ST2830

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.44.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.44.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per A on Table below

Wired as per A on Table below

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Wired as per B on Table below

Wired as per B on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.11.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.11.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per C on Table below

Wired as per C on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.26.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.26.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per D on Table below

Wired as per D on Table below

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Wired as per E on Table below

Wired as per E on Table below

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Wayne Kerr Meter B424/N Sourcetronic ST2830 LCR Meter

A. One Inductor only (Both Inductors give similar results)

5.39 mH 7.59 mH

B. Both inductors at one end

73 μH 50.82 μH

C. Both inductors diagonally

23.9 mH 27.24 mH

6.51 mH 8.75 mH

27 μH 12.78 μH

Well there goes that cunning plan…

It turns out that if you put two inductors in series, that while yes you double the turns, and double the inductance, this only works if you are not doubling the turns on the same core! just doubling the turns on a core quadruples the inductance, as we can see from above.

Lucky for me, I had a Schaffner RN114-1.2-02 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A laying around, so I will use one side of that.

Schematics for Filter 2

Schematics for Filter 2

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Filter1-B.png?fit=300%2C100&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Filter1-B.png?fit=676%2C226&ssl=1" />
Schaffner T9841 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A

Schaffner T9841 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-27-09.49.48.jpg?fit=300%2C203&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-27-09.49.48.jpg?fit=676%2C457&ssl=1" />

Looking back at the original results, which were performed with the following setup. We can see that it is only the conducted emission we have to try and win back:

HLK-PM01 loaded with a 33Ω resistor as per original test

HLK-PM01 loaded with a 33Ω resistor as per original test

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-testing-6-e1452906911884.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-testing-6-e1452906911884.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-B.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-B.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-A.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-A.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Radiated Emissions - Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments and Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Radiated Emissions – Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments and Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Radiated-Emisions.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Radiated-Emisions.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />

So lets look at the results using Filter 1:

HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments - Live Side using Filter 1

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments – Live Side using Filter 1

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F1-Live-Side.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F1-Live-Side.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments - Neutral Side using Filter 1

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments – Neutral Side using Filter 1

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F2-Neutral-Side.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F2-Neutral-Side.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />

As you can see while there is some improvement of the Live conductor however the Neutral conductor still lets the circuit down. unlike last time I am not looking at the Class A limit lines due to BS EN 55022 “Information technology equipment. Radio disturbance characteristics. Limits and methods of measurement” [pdf] no longer being a current standard, and its replacement BS EN 55032:2015 “Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements” further restricts the get out clause for using Class A limits:

However also in Tom’s email was a solution that he had come up with that has slightly more components (And lucky for me the RN102-0.6-02 is the correct component):

Building it up out of components and wire I had laying around, I think it goes without saying that I can do daft things because I know what I am doing, but here it goes anyway. Please don’t use this size of wire when you do anything like this!

This is a common mode filter, any common mode noise should be removed by the choke, the additional capacitance (and ground wiring) should help to take out differential mode noise. lets see how it goes…

Schematics for Filter 2

Schematics for Filter 2

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?fit=300%2C159&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?fit=676%2C358&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Plugged into LISN with Filter Two

HLK-PM01 – Plugged into LISN with Filter Two

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/hlk-in-LISN.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/hlk-in-LISN.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />

Ok so the results from testing:

Some how I have managed to kill the HLK-PM01, as I don’t trust the results I have got from the Neutral line scan, however the live side scan does show a close pass to Class B limits.

While I would not be happy using this Switched mode PSU to make anything I was going to place on the market, I may consider it!

If you are making a product that users are required to plug in, Please, please send CASS Industries an email to ask about testing!

The test results on this page are indicative, and in no way constitute evidence of a pass! and as the Irish or welsh would say “Well sir, if I were you, I wouldn’t start from here” I would go with something like a VIGORTRONIX VTX-214-005-105 AC/DC PCB Mount Power Supply (Farnell #2401040 ), as for only a few quid more you win a switch mode PSU that stands a chance of not requiring external components to pass Class B!

by Skippy at April 01, 2017 11:28 AM

March 28, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 28 March, 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Five topics for the week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at March 28, 2017 11:07 PM

Hackspace Manchester

What does 89p get you? Autopsy of a Chinese phone charger

Every so often we see on line storeys of fake chargers burning down houses, and electric shocks. Normally these chargers are refereed to as ‘Apple’ or ‘iPhone’ chargers, however that is just because the small triangle chargers (in a variety of colours) are so prevalent. An official Apple 5W USB Power Adapter (link).

A while ago (pre Britex referendum) I bought a 89p phone charger (with free shipping) from Ali express (link to a 96p one), just to see how ‘good’ it is, lets just say that you wont be surprised by any of this:

The Phone charger is a BS1363 ish plug, so testing it is easer than testing either the HLK-PM01 or the cheap Chinese crap one (And yes I know I promised to revisit the HLK-PM01 to try and get a fix).

Having a quick go at checking to see how well it conforms to BS EN 55032:2015 – “Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements” (until the beginning of this month I would have considered BS EN 55022 [pdf]), It will have to comply to the Class B (Residential / Domestic) limit lines for conducted and radiated emissions

Conducted Emissions testing give us these results:

Radiated Emissions testing give us these results:

Looking at these two graphs, you can see that while the radiated emissions are fine, it fails to meet the requirements of the conducted emissions (Blue squares below the red line, green circles below the blue line). now we know its not permissible to place the charger on the market in the EU (including the UK) from an emissions point of view. We can now assess its electrical safety.

So lets look at what happens when we perform a quick LVD screen test

The results for the LVD screen test:

  • Offload DC out 5.3 V
  • DC maximum output before supply folded ~1 A
  • Power used – 3 W off load, 8 W @ 1 A
  • Earth Pin is ok, however spacing issues with Live and Neutral
  • Fails a breakdown test 600 Vac @ 1 mA (does not recover).
  • No secondary securing of internal primary wire to pins, or PCB.
  • Single insulation mains in contact with LV / Secondary side.
  • No physical barrier between Pins and PCB
  • Capacitor between Primary and Secondary circuits is not Y rated.
  • Separation between Primary and Secondary does not meet requirements.
  • No mains fuse fitted
  • Solder on rear of pins in physical contact with capacitor on secondary side.
  • No Class II symbol on regulatory markings

I am sure it is safe to say that I was not surprised by the lack of conformity of the charger, I was however surprised at just how terrible it was!

I have had a number of iPhones over the years, and as such I have two real iPhone Chargers laying around, have a look at the markings on these two:

by Skippy at March 28, 2017 09:49 PM

March 27, 2017

Pumping Station: One

NERP Tonite: Replicape rev B!

Tonight at NERP, Elias Bakken of Intelligent Agent AS and Thing-printer, in Oslo, Norway, will tell us about the Replicape rev B. [http://wiki.thing-printer.com/index.php?title=Replicape_rev_B]

“Replicape is a high end 3D-printer electronics package in the form of
a Cape that can be placed on a BeagleBone Black. This page is about
the Major revision B. It has five high power and low noise stepper
motors with cool running MosFets and it has been designed to fit in
small spaces without active cooling and without the need for physical
access to the board once installed. That means no potentiometers to
trim or switches to flip.”

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at
http:// www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/
Doors open at 6:30pm. NERP is free and open to the public. Ed Bennett ed @ kinetics and electronics com Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source, raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One

The post NERP Tonite: Replicape rev B! appeared first on Pumping Station: One.

by edbennett at March 27, 2017 11:54 PM

March 26, 2017

NYC Resistor

Laser cut Fractal Puzzle

Team effort

THe Gosper Curve is a self-similar fractal that can be turned into a visually interesting, yet very difficult puzzle on the laser cutter. With all of the pieces the same color it is nearly impossible, but a bi-color version is a doable challenge. You can move the slices (in blue in the SVG file) around to vary the puzzle or change the difficulty; the current version has lots of very similar pieces to make it full of “garden paths” that require frequent back-tracking when the solution almost works.

Laser cutting Gosper curves
More details are posted on trmm.net/Fractal_Puzzle and the design files are thing:2204078 on thingiverse.

by hudson at March 26, 2017 03:05 AM

March 24, 2017

Swindon Makerspace

Making an OpenLog Serial Logger from Spare Parts

Part of our makerspace access system involves an Arduino and an ESP8266. Mostly it works just fine, but every now and again the Arudino seems to lock up and stop working. Various attempts have been made to stop this happening, but so far to no avail. Leaving a laptop connected to the Arduino’s serial port for debugging wasn’t happening because it happens quite infrequently and no-one had a spare laptop to leave lying around.

Enter the OpenLog! You can buy OpenLog boards for just over £10 (less if you are willing to pay the China-wait-for-delivery-tarrif) but where’s the fun in that? I remembered that I had an SD card reader breakout board languishing unused in a drawer (it came with my 3d printer kit and I’ve never gotten round to fitting it). And who doesn’t have some random Arduino boards lying around? It should be simple to make one right? right?

Nothing is ever quite so simple….

The Hardware

My first thought was that I’d need a 3.3V Arduino, because SD cards all run on 3.3V. Of course the Pro-Minis that I had were 5V; curses! Okay so I’ll need a level shifter as well but at least I have those. But wait! This SD card reader module is designed to connect to a RAMPS board that’s on an Arduino Mega and those things run at 5V…. On closer inspection the SD card reader module has a 74hc4050d IC on board, a quick bit of googling reveals that is a level shifter. Good, so I can use the 5V Pro Mini I have and the SD card reader module, but no need for another little board with a level shifter on.

IC1 is the level-shifter

Next problem, none of the pins on the SD card reader module are labelled! I could check the RAMPS pinout, but that’s somewhat confusing because the connector on the RAMPS has 8 pins and my module has 12. After a lot of scrolling through Google images I finally found one that looks to be the same and has the pinout at this link, so it’s an HCMODU0044.

Time to do some spaghetti wiring. Connect GND and 5V to, er, GND and 5V on the Pro Mini. Connect up SCK, SO and SI from the card reader to SCK (pin 13), MISO (pin 12) and MOSI (pin 11) on the Pro Mini. CS, what to do with that? Reading the main OpenLog sketch from their github repo, there is a handy define that SD_CHIP_SELECT is pin 10. That’s probably CS then, makes sense using pins 10-13.

Finally take a random LED and 22ohm resistor from the makerspace electronic parts stock and connect it to the other GND and pin 5.  This will be the status LED.

The Software

My plan here was to download the code from github and flash it.  Job done.  Nope, too simple!  It seems that the latest code (at the time of writing) doesn’t actually build.  Eventually I stumbled across this page which, as well being a good overview of using OpenLog, also contains a button to “Download OpenLog Firmware Bundle” about half way down the page.

This code compiled “better” than the latest from github, but still failed.  Downloading the latest Serial Port library, as directed on the OpenLog page and I finally had a version of the code that would compile.  This was using Arduino 1.6.8, the OpenLog page indicated they were using 1.6.5, so I suspect some incompatibilities have been introduced somewhere along the way.

Testing the OpenLog board using an FTDI lead and the Arudino serial console resulted in the text I typed ending up in a file on the SD card! Hurrah!

Final Thoughts

It had taken me maybe an hour to wire up and program, but that was after a couple of failed starts and a fair bit of rummaging around on the internet beforehand.  It seems like a useful debugging tool to have in your box of tricks, I’m not sure why I’ve never bought or put one together before.  It would be nice to build it onto a little PCB to tidy up the wiring, but that’s a project for another day….

Has it helped to fix the problem with the makerspace access control system?  We don’t know yet….

The post Making an OpenLog Serial Logger from Spare Parts appeared first on Swindon Makerspace.

by RobertCL at March 24, 2017 08:38 PM

March 22, 2017

NYC Resistor

The 8th Annual Interactive Show: Call For Projects

It’s that time of year again. Spring is supposedly in the air and it’s time for another Interactive Show! This year’s theme is The Running Man. The 80’s dystopian future sci-fi takes place in 2017 and has so many great campy elements. Who can resist lo-fi graphics, spandex costumes, hexagonal decode systems, and a villain in LED studded armor? The projects practically create themselves! Elements from similar 80’s dystopia flicks like Max Headroom are also a great idea.

So save the date for May 13th and drop us a line to submit your projects! Projects don’t necessarily have to be on theme, just something you want to show off at a party.

therunningmanposter-cropped

runningmanintro

runningmanbakersfield

runningmanperimeter

runningmanhexagon

runningmandynamo

runningmanfireball

by potatono at March 22, 2017 07:39 PM

March 21, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 21 Mar 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Five topics for the week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at March 21, 2017 10:31 PM