Earth is the Hackerspaces Planet

May 29, 2017

NYC Resistor

We’re open for Craft Night

Holidays? What holidays! Resistor will be open as usual tonight for Craft Night / Knit Knight.

by Bonnie Eisenman at May 29, 2017 09:56 PM

LVL1

Wood working Class – A foundation Course (cutting boards)

RSVP Link Wood working sessions to teach you everything you need to know to make a cutting board and beyond! Next class is Monday the 20th at 6:30pm! Powered by Eventbrite

by Terry Runner at May 29, 2017 10:00 AM

May 26, 2017

CrashSpace

Recording a Variable Strobe Light

Steve and I made a really fun fountain controlled by a bike pump for Maker Faire 2017. It was a huge hit with attendees. Unfortunately, sharing it on social media was a pain:

View post on imgur.com

This is the problem whenever you are trying to record a strobe lit object. Black bars show up on your screen. It’s possible to make them smaller with some settings, but I figured I wanted to make it completely go away. Our fountain has a variable strobe, depending on the bike pump, that makes the problem even harder to sync to.

Luckily, I had an industrial camera with a trigger input.

I was able to sync the trigger output on the 24V line of the fountain directly to the trigger input of the Cognex 2000-130 camera. I’d like to get a higher quality and different lens for this camera, but the basics worked. It showed the image fully.

View post on imgur.com

Final product becomes a nice image with no flickering and no horrible bars. Video. I used CAM Studio to record the screen on Cognex’s InSight Explorer.

If you have a strobe fountain or other effect and want to record decent video without the scan bars or hum bars, this is a possibility. Send the same output from your strobe to your camera and record the video onscreen.

More information about our levitating fountain and check out the HackADay post about it.

by Kevin at May 26, 2017 03:23 AM

Levitating Fountain

Steve Goldstein and Kevin Jordan confused a plethora of stunned Makerfaire makers with their levitating fountain.

We used an oscillating pump to create a constant stream of equal droplets for the old trick of water that looks like it stands still using a strobe light. Luckily, we have too much time on our hands and a lot of junk hanging around. We modified the stroboscopic effect by adding a standard bike pump hooked up to an air pressure sensor then had an Arduino Nano change the strobe frequency of a high powered LED strobe light.

The effect is stunning in-person as the user of the bike pump feels like they are pumping air into the stream of floating water to make it float to the top. Our fellow maker faire makers were really in disbelief.

Confused Maker Faire attendees.

Thanks Mike at Hackaday for this awesome video!

Checkout his entire write up over at Hackaday.

It was great hanging out at the CrashSpace 2017 booth with Theron, Barb, Jay, Michael, Tom, Matt, Mark, Wendy and the thousands of people who came by to say hi.

Edit: Mike posted just about the best looking video I’ve seen:

Another really great project. A levitating fountain. This is an extremely challenging project to create.

A post shared by Mike Koenigs (@mikekoenigs) on May 21, 2017 at 4:23pm PDT

Edit 5/25/2017: Figured out a way to record a variable strobe without those annoying bars.

by Kevin at May 26, 2017 12:09 AM

May 24, 2017

CrashSpace

Urban Neighbors: The Biodiversity of Urban Los Angeles: Watch Online!

This event was a part of the Civic Engagement Survival Guide: a series of free talks and workshops focused on creating a community that is informed, organized, and engaged.

Samantha Sullivan is a graduate student in pursuit of a Masters in Biology with an emphasis in wildlife conservation. Currently, she works with communities both locally and internationally on assessing barriers and collaborating with locals and conservation organizations in the region to create solutions that work toward coexistence between wildlife and the community. Recently, Samantha came to speak at CRASH Space to educate our community about how we can protect our local wildlife.

If you’re interested in conservation, Samantha also provided us with a useful list of links to the initiatives, organizations, and resources she mentioned in her talk:

You can learn more about Samantha through her website, www.openspacescoalition.com. Watch past videos or view upcoming events on the Civic Engagement Survival Guide.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at May 24, 2017 02:47 AM

May 23, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 23 May 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at May 23, 2017 06:43 PM

May 21, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Bronze Casting!!!!!!

As you may have noticed, the Small Metals area has moved to where hot metals used to live. The process has been gradual but successful. We conducted an experiment over the weekend involving plaster investment and molten bronze. There were many variables in this process including new-to-the-space machinery: the kiln, the electric melting furnace, and the vacuum investment table. As well as different materials used, possibly expired flux, a new kind of plaster, and a type of bronze that had been melted a number of times before. All in all it was a great success. Here is a brief overview along with some photos to enjoy.

Seen here is the kiln at a glowing red temperature of 1,500 degrees. The molten bronze getting ready for the pour. Also seen in this picture is the vacuum table for the cast to help pull the metal through the investment.

The Termolyne mini melt electric melting furnace! Bronze has a melting point of 1,742 degrees 

The pour!

 

Fresh out of the pickle!

Finished rings! All of them (except the black stone in the middle) were cast at PS:One.

-Ella Gentz

by ellagentz at May 21, 2017 11:23 PM

May 16, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 16 May 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  •  Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at May 16, 2017 11:45 PM

NYC Resistor

Visitor projects: the most excellent blanket

Hey NYCR visitors – have you done something neat lately? Let us know, so we can blog about it!

Julia learned to knit in December at NYC Resistor. And then, uh….this blanket happened. Julia, you’re amazing. Students outshining their teachers, etc.

I can vouch for this blanket being extremely cozy. You’re looking at 30 skeins (6,540 yards!) of yarn and 1,040 tails that needed weaving in. It comfortably fits three people.

If you want to make your own blanket, the Infinite Rainbow Throw pattern is free from KnitPicks.

Don’t know how to knit? Wish you had more knitting time? Join us every other Monday for our Knit Knight, 730pm-930pm. We’ll teach you – beginners get their first pair of needles free. (You don’t need to be as intense as Julia in order to attend Knit Knight, we promise.)

by Bonnie Eisenman at May 16, 2017 02:22 PM

May 15, 2017

LVL1

Absolute Beginners Computer Programming Class

Monday, May 15th from 7-9 pm in the LVL1 Classroom. We will be learning to program using the free KhanAcademy programming tutorials that are online. This class will be teaching the “processing” computer language which is very similar to C, javascript and the Arduino code. You could just go through the tutorials online by yourself, […]

by Jessica Elle at May 15, 2017 02:12 PM

May 11, 2017

LVL1

Bob Ross Hack-A-Thon

Bob Ross and chill with the LVL1 crew on Friday, May 12th from 7 pm onwards. Our weekly movie night will consist of Bob Ross painting episodes on the big screen along with free pizza, friends, and fun. There will be prizes for the happiest trees, the saddest trees, the hackiest trees, and the OMG […]

by Jessica Elle at May 11, 2017 08:13 PM

May 09, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 9 May 2017

 

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  • NEW: Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at May 09, 2017 09:50 PM

May 08, 2017

NYC Resistor

Interactive Show Preview: Dance Dance Running Man

dancerun

Join the fun at the NYC Resistor Interactive Show this Saturday, where you can play Dance Dance Running Man by Colleen AF Venable, Eric Skiff, and Astrida Valigorsky:

Dance Dance Running Man revives the dance-game classic DDR as dystopian chase game. Keep those feet moving while the chasers chase from behind the arrows and Arnold keeps them at bay. Featuring images from the film and pro-level DDR pads, you’ll be dancing for your life!

Come play with it yourself at The Interactive Show on May 13th! Tickets are just $15 in advance ($20 at the door), and the libations are on us. Get your tickets now!

ezgif-2-857b32491a

by Becky Stern at May 08, 2017 07:27 PM

Interactive Show Preview: Who Do You Love

00004IMG_00004_BURST20170504124126

Come to the NYC Resistor Interactive Show this Saturday to see “Who Do You Love” by Adelle Lin, Olivia Barr, and Matt Pinner:

A deplorable reality television host rises to power by exploit people for the sake of entertainment. He uses a nightmarish cacophony of violence and catch phrases to control his audience. In The Running Man this media mogul shouts, “Who Loves You and Who Do You Love?”

Who Do You Love is an interactive sound installation that samples Donald Trump saying the word “China” in phrases from his campaign and presidency. The interface device for the installation consists of three acrylic towers, dispersed through the space. Each tower houses three buttons where players can activate the sound from different locations. Pressing a button triggers the Commander and Chief to say “china”, “i love china”, “i know china very well”, or “china all the time”.

Burst_Cover_GIF_Action_20170211233509

The phrases overlap each time a button is pushed to create an ambiance of garbled memetastic catch phrases. The towers encase a teensy audio shield, teensy 3.2, xbee, and our custom oshpark pcb. the devices connect to each other using these 900mhz xbee radios and light up clear acrylic portions with led sequins when buttons are pressed anywhere in the space. The new echo of “China” is channeled into the exhibition room’s speakers or through headphones. Multiple players of Who Loves You collaborate to compel the distortion of Trump’s reflections on China into noise.

We hope this raises some discussions about your feelings around entertainment media and representative governments.

More info on Github.

Come play with it yourself at The Interactive Show on May 13th! Tickets are just $15 in advance ($20 at the door), and the libations are on us. Get your tickets now!

by Becky Stern at May 08, 2017 07:24 PM

Pumping Station: One

Turning the Shopbot into a plotter

Former PS:1 president Derek Bever and I were joking in the PS:1 IRC chat room awhile back about using the Shopbot as a tool for uses it was not designed for, and turning it into a plotter seemed especially ridiculous. Since I’d wanted to learn how to use the Clausing lathe, it dawned on me that this ridiculous idea could, in fact, become a terrifying reality. So thanks to Anna Yu who taught me how to use the lathe, I made a bit with an 11mm bore to fit into the 1/2″ collet on the Shoptbot:

Having spent the time to make the part, it seemed silly to stop there, so I realized I’d have to make a post-processor for VCarve and Aspire (Fusion 360 coming soon!). I already had experience with Shopbot’s post-processors, creating a “Always turn spindle off” version of Ryan’s “Always turn spindle on” post processor as well as the XYZ Zero Finder program that works with the XYZ plate made on the Bridgeport. So hunkering down on the computer in the CNC Lounge (where Aspire is installed), I made a “Sharpie Bit” post processor that 1. always turns the spindle off, and 2. always sets Z to 0, regardless of what is done in Aspire or VCarve. This also means you have to explicitly set Z’s 0 position without use of the Z plate as there’s nothing to tell the machine when the ‘bit’ is at the right spot.

The first attempt was made using some cardboard I found in the garbage. This test did not go well because I had set Z to 0 in one corner of the cardboard, but because the cardboard was folded over, it was more puffy in the middle, which means that the Shopbot happily plunged the sharpie into the cardboard. Oops. Try #2 used a piece of acrylic that was laying around and I assumed was garbage, so I used that and the second attempt went much better. Inspired, I grabbed some acrylic from my shelf and made the version below.

I’m going to clean up the code a little (like removing a bunch of debugging stuff, unnecessary pauses, etc.,) and then will run it by Matt (CNC area host) and if he’s cool with it, the bit will go in the drawer and the post processor available to anyone using VCarve and Aspire.

by tachoknight at May 08, 2017 02:48 PM

May 04, 2017

Hive76

Learn CAD at Hive76; Fusion 360 class with Chris Thompson

Make shape with tool

Computer Aided Design is the way we interact with the digital tools that make things. Do you want to try 3D printing or laser cutting? Ever want to CNC mill something from a chunk of aluminum? The first step is getting your idea into the computer.Cross section of CAD model for illustration

Fusion 360 by Autodesk is a powerful parametric CAD tool that is free to use for makers, educators, and even most startups. It rivals SolidWorks in its functionality, but adds features found in many standalone tools. Your instructor Chris Thompson is a certified CAD professional with experience teaching digital making to beginners and professionals alike.

In this class you will learn the basics of most CAD systems and the intricacies of the Fusion 360 interface with hands-on demonstrations. The evening will begin with a general overview of CAD. There will be a structured walk-through of the program where every student creates the same model. This is followed by individual work where students explore the numerous different ways to make any one shape. Do you build up feature-by-feature, or would you rather carve away piece-by-piece? The class will reveal the hidden pitfalls of the program and any caveats. We will cover exporting your files for the next step in making. Any remaining time in the evening will be dedicated to answering any questions you have about CAD or making.

The class is Thursday, June 1 2017 from 7pm – 9pm at Hive76

Tickets are $50 and can be purchased from our ticketleap page. Members, don’t forget your discount!
Students must bring their own laptop with Fusion 360 installed and a 3 button mouse (left, right, scroll wheel button.) Please bring some paper for sketching and notes too.
Students will also need a free Autodesk account to save their work. Please follow these instructions to get set up with a free account.

by eagleapex at May 04, 2017 01:07 AM

May 02, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 2 May 2017

My heart made that glowstick cracking noise, with the blue sadness leaking out. It made that noise twice on Saturday night. Once when the very nice young woman said she was surprised I was so technical because I seemed so artsty. (I was wearing a scarf?)  The second crunch landed when a different even younger woman agreed that folks are either creative or technical, and, further, she said that she was not creative which is why she’d do just fine in computer science.

My goal for me in this shockingly common situation has always been not to react to the ooze starting to cover my face. The job is to smile, to recruit, to teach about creative coding and STEAM initiatives. The job is to tell these young folks that they don’t have to layer their fantastical dreams away in tissue paper to be engineers or simply to do some engineering.  Even though I know how hard it’s been for me.  It should be easier for them. Please let it be easier for them. Please help me make it easier for them.

I need even more evidence, so this Tuesday Sweep I’d like to make a request. I’d like to add a new item to the check list. Please make sure to publish your crazy projects and the things that you’ve learned. Even if they seem little and stupid. Especially if they seem little and stupid.  If you’re a member do it here. Do it on hackaday.io. Put it on instructables, your own site. Also especially on places where the someone might randomly run into it. Instagram, Youtube, where ever. Publish. Publish. Publish. Wear your projects on you back pack.  Put them up in your cubicle. Carry them around on your phone. Print out a function you’re particularly proud of on archival paper and frame that sucker up.  There is a whole new generation with the exact same hang ups as before. STILL! We must show them!

The technical is creative and the creative is technical.  If any city in the world can show that off, it’s us here in LA. We know this message here at CRASH Space. Let’s show it!

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

  • NEW: Did you learn something cool in your sweep? Make something? Share it!
  • Speak up
  • Give
  • Show up at CRASH Space tonight!

by carlyn at May 02, 2017 08:05 PM

April 28, 2017

NYC Resistor

Interactive Show Preview: Panorama Lamp

Here’s another Interactive Show preview, this time of “Panorama Lamp” by Kirill Shevyakov, Alexander Savvy, and Paul Koch. Check it out in action in this video.

Panorama Lamp Panaorama Lamp panorama lamp video

The Panorama lamp is a tribute to a monumental Soviet architecture. Inspired by a colossal concrete curves and extraordinary aesthetic of USSR structures this lamp is a miniature replica of a soviet movie theatre. The surface of the lamp is divided into 70 units creating a 360 degree visual grid. Each unit encompasses an LED which forms a vast “canvas” for various interactions, light sequences, and data visualizations.

Come play with it yourself at The Interactive Show on May 13th! Tickets are just $15 in advance ($20 at the door), and the libations are on us. Get your tickets now!

by potatono at April 28, 2017 03:21 PM

April 26, 2017

NYC Resistor

Interactive Show Preview: Red Rider

Time has been flying and we’ve been frantically getting ready for The Interactive Show. It’s just 17 days away! Here’s a preview of “Red Rider” by Ranjit Bhatnagar and Colleen AF Venable.

-1

Red Rider

A modern take on Little Red Riding Hood with a NYC twist. The story is told in six voices, each giving their version of what happened—including Red Rider (the fastest bike messenger in the city), the now-vegan Wolf, the Lumberjock (who always gives 110%), three very bizarre little pigs, and a maybe-not-so-sweet-and-innocent Grandma. Find the six listening stations and see if you can you figure out what happened to the Wolf.

Tickets are just $15 in advance, and the libations are on us. Get your tickets now!

There’s still time to submit a project before the May 1st deadline, contact us!

by potatono at April 26, 2017 03:14 PM

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 25 April 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news?

  • Disney Land’s Space Mountain will be returned to it’s classic theme starting June 1 after doing some Star Wars Cos Play for the past couple of years. This year marks the ride’s 40th anniversary as well as the anniversary of Star Wars A New Hope coming up on May 25th.(via curbed)
  • Call your congress people, notify the DHS – We must not require passwords at the border!
  • When can you see “apple.com” in the URL bar of your browser and have it not be “apple.com”? When its some other crazy unicode URL that gets rendered as “apple.com” for …reasons? If you type the URL directly, there should be no problem. What I love about it, is this URL bar hijacking exploit provides a wonderful excuse to remind yourself or learn how a numeric based system like computers can display words and letters at all. Watch Computerphile’s “Characters, Symbols and the Unicode Miracle.”
  • Carnegie Mellon University has released a comprehensive list of C++ secure-coding best practices. via Schneier
  • For me, sustainable processes allow better long term planning and therefore security.  Right on time for Earth Day last week Apple announced its aim to develop a “closed loop supply chain” that uses no newly mined materials.  (also via Ars Technica.)
  • I have no military background. I was unfamiliar until today with the phrase “kill chain,” which apparently simply means the chain of events that needs happen for a target to be destroyed. It’s a bit emo as a phrase, but it is useful as a concept. If you happen to be on defense, like any of us with computers on the internet are, your job is to disrupt that chain anywhere you can because destroying even just one link will wreck the plans of bad actors poking around on your network.  This phrase caught my eye was all tangled up with one of the buzz phrases I keep an eye out for, “Internet of Things,” in an article where author thinly rehashed a Lockheed Martin (now Leidos) white paper.  A better introduction would be the talk Marissa Kimball of Palantir gave at GovCon 2013: “Up Against APT: Dissecting the Kill Chain” which breaks this subject down well. This line of searching lead me also to thephrase “Anomaly Detection” and Elizabeth (Betsy) Nichols Ph.D. excellent “Anomaly Detection 101” talk as well.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at April 26, 2017 12:14 AM

April 20, 2017

Hackspace Manchester

April 19, 2017

KwartzLab Makerspace

Repair Cafe this Sunday!

Repair Cafe

It’s that time again for another Repair Cafe! In partnership with TransitionKW, we’re hosting another event this Sunday, April 23rd from noon until 4pm.

DON’T THROW YOUR BROKEN STUFF AWAY! Bring in your busted items and we’ll try and help you fix it (FOR FREE)! In the past we’ve done electronics, appliances, furniture, toys, clothing and more. Free coffee and munchies will be provided!

Register for Repairs!

If you’ve got something you’d like us to have a look at, please fill out a reservation using the Eventbrite link below:

RESERVE YOUR REPAIR SLOT

By registering ahead of time, we can ensure someone will be on hand to help you with your item!

See you there!

The post Repair Cafe this Sunday! appeared first on KwartzLab Makerspace.

by Ben at April 19, 2017 05:55 PM

April 14, 2017

NYC Resistor

April 22nd: All-Day CryptoParty

Photo by Huck Magazine.

Photo by Huck Magazine.

CryptoParty returns to NYC Resistor on April 22nd, 2017 for a night of learning about your digital defense in the age of mass surveillance from Fort Meade and Madison Ave. Stop by anytime between 3PM and 9PM and enjoy snacks and skills from a variety of online security practitioners and researchers. We’re hosting a full day mix of and hands-on-help with everything from vetting a good VPN to navigating Tor and Signal.

If you’ve never been to Resistor before, check our Participate page for more info, including the Code of Conduct. Hope to see you there! If you’ve never been a CryptoParty before, please check out the CryptoParty Guiding Principles.

When:

Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 3:00PM – 9:00PM.

Where:

NYC Resistor (between Bergen and Dean)
87 3rd Ave. Floor 4 (use this OSM link if you’re Richard Stallman)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

by David Huerta at April 14, 2017 03:00 PM

April 13, 2017

CrashSpace

Representative Town Halls: Make Your Voice Heard!

The House and Senate are in recess, which means it is time for our representatives to come home and meet with their constituents.

Both of our California Senators have town halls coming up. Join us in making our voices heard by showing up in person with your questions ready:

  • Senator Feinstein Town Hall: RSVP REQUIRED. Thurs, Apr 20th @ 11:00AM
  • Senator Harris Town Hall: RSVP REQUIRED. Fri, Apr 21st @ 3:30PM

As for the House, here at CRASH Space our local representative is Congresswoman Bass. She does not currently have a town hall scheduled, but she does have a relevant event:
From Nixon to Trump: Perspectives on Presidential Accountability. Wed, Apr 19th @ 6:30PM

Kudos to Congresswoman Bass for being the only one of our representatives to choose a meeting time that is outside of daytime working hours.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at April 13, 2017 01:46 AM

April 12, 2017

NYC Resistor

Get Your Tickets for the 2017 Interactive Show!

runningman-invite-facebook

We’re just about a month away from the 2017 NYC Resistor Interactive Show on May 13th! This year’s theme is The Running Man. The 80s dystopian future sci-fi takes place in 2017 and has so many great campy elements. Who can resist lo-fi graphics, spandex costumes, hexagonal decode systems, and a villain in LED studded armor? The projects practically create themselves! Got a project you want in the show? Elements from similar 80s flicks like Barb Wire, Cherry 2000 and Max Headroom are also a great idea. Submit your project by May 1st!

Don’t have a project but want to relive the futures of the past in the present! Get your tickets to the show today before they sell out!

When:

Saturday, May 13th, 2017 8:00PM – Late.

Where:

NYC Resistor (between Bergen and Dean)
87 3rd Ave. Floor 4 (use this OSM link if you’re Richard Stallman)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

by David Huerta at April 12, 2017 12:56 AM

April 11, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 11 April 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Topics this week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at April 11, 2017 11:46 PM

April 05, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 4 April 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Only 6 topics this week:

  • Hack-a-Day won April Fools as far as I’m concerned, although the EFF newsletter is a strong runner up.
  • Brilliant idea of the week! Everyone should encrypt their email by knitting their messages into scarves and sending them via snail mail. Kniterate, a digital knitting machine based on OpenKnit, is the project to make it happen. Whose with me? Anyone anyone? Well, the Kickstarter is cool.
  • You know what’s better than this weekly post? SANS newsletters.  The @Risk one last week highlighted the same Ars Technica article on Symantec that I picked out, so I might be a bit biased.  However, for those of you trying to come up with a good recommendation for those who aren’t so tech savvy “OUCH” their newsletter for the common-user might be just the ticket.
  • Issue of the week: Symantec’s Stamp Tramp behavior for issuing https certificates makes them a persona non-gratta with private researchers and Google via Ars Technica (not for the first time)
  • Fresh off the Press from Krebs on Security: The Taylor Huddleston story.  When is a software programmer criminally liable for the behavior of their users?
  • In the don’t freak out, but appreciate how clever the monkeys are category of exploits – Using sound to hijack devices with accelerometers is insane, clever, and how can this be a burning man art project this year???
  • Who knew? The cryptography literature has an extended universe with recurring characters and everything. I’m totally charmed.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at April 05, 2017 06:18 PM

April 03, 2017

NYC Resistor

Interactive Show CFP deadline is May 1st

Projects are starting to roll in for the Interactive Show! We’re going to set a deadline of May 1st for project submissions. If you have something you would like to show off, contact us.

runningman-invite-facebook

by potatono at April 03, 2017 03:17 PM

April 01, 2017

Hackspace Manchester

Sonoff smart wifi switch

Bob found these ESP8266 based Wi-Fi Relays from china, the “Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch For MQTT COAP Smart Home” and being that he is is kind of a geek he bought some, now in typical China fashion the difference between 3 and 5 was not all that much, so he got two extra for me to glance over.

Please remove mains from the unit if you are looking at the unit! this is not a Class II device and 230 VAC is present on both sides of the PCB.

UART pinout

UART pinout

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?fit=229%2C153&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-03-29-16.47.26.jpg?fit=229%2C153&ssl=1" />

Sonoff is a WiFi wireless switch that can connect to appliance of different types and brands. Sonoff sends data to cloud platform through the WiFi Router, which enables you to remotely control all appliances with the App eWeLink on your smartphone.

The manufactures specification is as such:

  • Voltage range: 90-250v AC(50/60Hz)
  • Max current: 10A
  • Max Wattage: 2200 watts
  • Dimensions: (L)88*(W)38*(H)23mm
  • Color: White
  • Humidity: 5%-95%
  • Wireless Frequency: 2.4Ghz
  • Working Temp: ﹣20℃-75℃

Now the eagle eyed among you will have spotted the lack of CE or FCC marks anywhere on this! a quick look at the user guide also fails to mention any form of compliance.


So without much more waiting around let us have a look at the product.

ESP8266

The ESP8266 module is on the PCB, however does not seem to have any details of an FCC number, so is may not be a pre approved module, however they do make it easy to get to the UART.

Relay

Looking at the main components on the board, the relay shows us that it is part number HRS3FNH-S-DC5V-A

This particular part number does not appear to have an English data sheet available, so lets glance over one in Chinese (using the bits gleaned from Aliexpress for a different model as a reference).

  • HRS3FN – Model
  • H – High Sensitivity 200mW coil.
  • DC5V – Coil Voltage
  • A – Contact form (A or C) this claims that the Contact is rated for 10 A @ 250 VAC.

Mains Connectors

Screw connectors on Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch

There are two 5mm Pitch mains terminals on the PCB, These should be rated to the same or greater current as the box tells me it is rated for, so these should be safe for use with 10 A @ 230 VAC (the box also states 2.2 kW). Breaking out a bit of random scrap mains wire, I am going to make a test probe for these terminals:


Looking at the screw terminals a bit more, they look a lot like these Screw Terminal (5mm) from SparkFun (and other sellers). These screw terminals fail the strand test above, and the data sheet rates them for 8 A…

PCB Board

The layout is nice and tight, but is it too tight! the gap between Live and Neutral is a bit tight, I think it is safe to say that I feel it is a bit too close, The requirement for creepage distance between Live and Neutral before any fusing is a minimum of 2.4mm; there is no fusing on this PCB at all.

Emissions

Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions - Live Side

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions – Live Side

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-L.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-L.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions - Neutral Side

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Conducted Emissions – Neutral Side

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-N.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-Con-N.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 30MHz to 1 GHz

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 30MHz to 1 GHz

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RAD.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RAD.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
Sonoff - WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 1GHz to 3 GHz

Sonoff – WiFi Wireless Smart Switch for MQTT COAP Smart Home – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments or BS EN 55032:2015 Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements – Radiated Emissions 1GHz to 3 GHz

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RADu.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/son-RADu.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />

If you read the post about the HLK-PM01 you will know why I am using BS EN 55032 and not BS EN 55022 (CISPA 32 and CISPA 22), if not, its because BS EN 55022:2010 was Withdrawn on 05 March 2017, and replaced with BS EN 55032:2012, and CISPA 32 doesn’t have quite the same get out clauses as CISPA 22 did:

As we can see from the graphs above, its a fail on Conducted Emissions (Live Side has measurements, neutral didn’t. However they are very smiler). however on the other scans its a pass.

All in all, from a unit point of view, it is an interesting unit that I may be tempted to use (Fused at 5A), HOWEVER it does not meet the requirements of relevant standards, it is not electrically safe. It would be illegal to place this unit as is on the market within the European Union.

If you are making a product that users are required to wire it in or plug in, Please, please send CASS Industries an email to ask about testing!

The test results on this page are indicative, and in no way constitute evidence of a result!

by Skippy at April 01, 2017 10:48 PM

Revisiting the HLK-PM01

A while ago I looked at the HLK-PM01, and amazingly it turned into a very well read post… (do not even touch the cheaper crap!) with a lot of people asking how to make it work properly.

I also got an email from Tom at smart-sense.hr saying that he had used one of the HLK-PM01 modules, and his emission graphs were similar to the ones I produced in the last post. He had also been in contact with people at Hi-Link, the manufacturer who sent him the following solution.

I don’t have any 10 mH chokes (Well I probably do, I just have no idea which ones they are) however I have some 20 mH chokes, and a Schaffner RN102-0.6/02 which is 2 x 4.4 mH chokes in common mode (Farnell number 2097049).

I don’t use Inductors all that much as a component that I spec by value, but on paper Serial and Parallel Inductors behave nicely, so lets have a look at doing that:

 

At work we have two LCR meters, a Wayne Kerr B424/N and an Sourcetronic ST2830 (ST2830 LCR Meter Manual), so setting the RN102-0.6-02 up to each of them in a number of configurations I managed to get some values (easer than the maths, and less likely to be wrong):

RN102-0.6/02 - 2 x 4.4 mH

RN102-0.6/02 – 2 x 4.4 mH

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-15.13.51.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-15.13.51.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wayne Kerr B424/N

Wayne Kerr B424/N

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.37.21.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.37.21.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per A on Table below

Wired as per A on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.32.56.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.32.56.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per B on Table below

Wired as per B on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.34.34.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.34.34.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per C on Table below

Wired as per C on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.35.55.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.35.55.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per D on Table below

Wired as per D on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.28.23.jpg?fit=225%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.28.23.jpg?fit=676%2C901&ssl=1" />
Wired as per E on Table below

Wired as per E on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.29.51.jpg?fit=225%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.29.51.jpg?fit=676%2C901&ssl=1" />
Sourcetronic ST2830

Sourcetronic ST2830

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.44.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.44.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per A on Table below

Wired as per A on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.47.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.51.47.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per B on Table below

Wired as per B on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.11.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.11.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per C on Table below

Wired as per C on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.26.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-23-14.52.26.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per D on Table below

Wired as per D on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.37.58.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.37.58.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
Wired as per E on Table below

Wired as per E on Table below

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.30.11.jpg?fit=225%2C300&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-24-14.30.11.jpg?fit=676%2C901&ssl=1" />

 

Wayne Kerr Meter B424/N Sourcetronic ST2830 LCR Meter

A. One Inductor only (Both Inductors give similar results)

5.39 mH 7.59 mH

B. Both inductors at one end

73 μH 50.82 μH

C. Both inductors diagonally

23.9 mH 27.24 mH

6.51 mH 8.75 mH

27 μH 12.78 μH

Well there goes that cunning plan…

It turns out that if you put two inductors in series, that while yes you double the turns, and double the inductance, this only works if you are not doubling the turns on the same core! just doubling the turns on a core quadruples the inductance, as we can see from above.

Lucky for me, I had a Schaffner RN114-1.2-02 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A laying around, so I will use one side of that.

Schematics for Filter 2

Schematics for Filter 2

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Filter1-B.png?fit=300%2C100&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Filter1-B.png?fit=676%2C226&ssl=1" />
Schaffner T9841 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A

Schaffner T9841 2 x 10 mH 1.2 A

" data-medium-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-27-09.49.48.jpg?fit=300%2C203&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-03-27-09.49.48.jpg?fit=676%2C457&ssl=1" />

Looking back at the original results, which were performed with the following setup. We can see that it is only the conducted emission we have to try and win back:

HLK-PM01 loaded with a 33Ω resistor as per original test

HLK-PM01 loaded with a 33Ω resistor as per original test

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-testing-6-e1452906911884.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-testing-6-e1452906911884.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-B.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-B.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-A.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Conducted-Emisions-Class-A.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Radiated Emissions - Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments and Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

HLK-PM01 – Radiated Emissions – Class A -BS EN 61000-6-4:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for industrial environments and Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Radiated-Emisions.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/HLK-PM01-Radiated-Emisions.png?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />

So lets look at the results using Filter 1:

HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments - Live Side using Filter 1

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments – Live Side using Filter 1

" data-medium-file="https://i0.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F1-Live-Side.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F1-Live-Side.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Conducted Emissions - Class B - BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments - Neutral Side using Filter 1

HLK-PM01 – Conducted Emissions – Class B – BS EN 61000-6-3:2007+A1:2011 Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Generic standards. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments – Neutral Side using Filter 1

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F2-Neutral-Side.png?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/F2-Neutral-Side.png?fit=676%2C508&ssl=1" />

As you can see while there is some improvement of the Live conductor however the Neutral conductor still lets the circuit down. unlike last time I am not looking at the Class A limit lines due to BS EN 55022 “Information technology equipment. Radio disturbance characteristics. Limits and methods of measurement” [pdf] no longer being a current standard, and its replacement BS EN 55032:2015 “Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements” further restricts the get out clause for using Class A limits:

However also in Tom’s email was a solution that he had come up with that has slightly more components (And lucky for me the RN102-0.6-02 is the correct component):

Building it up out of components and wire I had laying around, I think it goes without saying that I can do daft things because I know what I am doing, but here it goes anyway. Please don’t use this size of wire when you do anything like this!

This is a common mode filter, any common mode noise should be removed by the choke, the additional capacitance (and ground wiring) should help to take out differential mode noise. lets see how it goes…

Schematics for Filter 2

Schematics for Filter 2

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?fit=300%2C159&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/filter2.png?fit=676%2C358&ssl=1" />
HLK-PM01 - Plugged into LISN with Filter Two

HLK-PM01 – Plugged into LISN with Filter Two

" data-medium-file="https://i1.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/hlk-in-LISN.jpg?fit=300%2C225&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i2.wp.com/skippy.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/hlk-in-LISN.jpg?fit=676%2C507&ssl=1" />

Ok so the results from testing:

Some how I have managed to kill the HLK-PM01, as I don’t trust the results I have got from the Neutral line scan, however the live side scan does show a close pass to Class B limits.

While I would not be happy using this Switched mode PSU to make anything I was going to place on the market, I may consider it!

If you are making a product that users are required to plug in, Please, please send CASS Industries an email to ask about testing!

The test results on this page are indicative, and in no way constitute evidence of a pass! and as the Irish or welsh would say “Well sir, if I were you, I wouldn’t start from here” I would go with something like a VIGORTRONIX VTX-214-005-105 AC/DC PCB Mount Power Supply (Farnell #2401040 ), as for only a few quid more you win a switch mode PSU that stands a chance of not requiring external components to pass Class B!

by Skippy at April 01, 2017 11:28 AM

March 28, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 28 March, 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Five topics for the week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at March 28, 2017 11:07 PM

Hackspace Manchester

What does 89p get you? Autopsy of a Chinese phone charger

Every so often we see on line storeys of fake chargers burning down houses, and electric shocks. Normally these chargers are refereed to as ‘Apple’ or ‘iPhone’ chargers, however that is just because the small triangle chargers (in a variety of colours) are so prevalent. An official Apple 5W USB Power Adapter (link).

A while ago (pre Britex referendum) I bought a 89p phone charger (with free shipping) from Ali express (link to a 96p one), just to see how ‘good’ it is, lets just say that you wont be surprised by any of this:

The Phone charger is a BS1363 ish plug, so testing it is easer than testing either the HLK-PM01 or the cheap Chinese crap one (And yes I know I promised to revisit the HLK-PM01 to try and get a fix).

Having a quick go at checking to see how well it conforms to BS EN 55032:2015 – “Electromagnetic compatibility of multimedia equipment. Emission Requirements” (until the beginning of this month I would have considered BS EN 55022 [pdf]), It will have to comply to the Class B (Residential / Domestic) limit lines for conducted and radiated emissions

Conducted Emissions testing give us these results:

Radiated Emissions testing give us these results:

Looking at these two graphs, you can see that while the radiated emissions are fine, it fails to meet the requirements of the conducted emissions (Blue squares below the red line, green circles below the blue line). now we know its not permissible to place the charger on the market in the EU (including the UK) from an emissions point of view. We can now assess its electrical safety.

So lets look at what happens when we perform a quick LVD screen test

The results for the LVD screen test:

  • Offload DC out 5.3 V
  • DC maximum output before supply folded ~1 A
  • Power used – 3 W off load, 8 W @ 1 A
  • Earth Pin is ok, however spacing issues with Live and Neutral
  • Fails a breakdown test 600 Vac @ 1 mA (does not recover).
  • No secondary securing of internal primary wire to pins, or PCB.
  • Single insulation mains in contact with LV / Secondary side.
  • No physical barrier between Pins and PCB
  • Capacitor between Primary and Secondary circuits is not Y rated.
  • Separation between Primary and Secondary does not meet requirements.
  • No mains fuse fitted
  • Solder on rear of pins in physical contact with capacitor on secondary side.
  • No Class II symbol on regulatory markings

I am sure it is safe to say that I was not surprised by the lack of conformity of the charger, I was however surprised at just how terrible it was!

I have had a number of iPhones over the years, and as such I have two real iPhone Chargers laying around, have a look at the markings on these two:

by Skippy at March 28, 2017 09:49 PM

March 27, 2017

Pumping Station: One

NERP Tonite: Replicape rev B!

Tonight at NERP, Elias Bakken of Intelligent Agent AS and Thing-printer, in Oslo, Norway, will tell us about the Replicape rev B. [http://wiki.thing-printer.com/index.php?title=Replicape_rev_B]

“Replicape is a high end 3D-printer electronics package in the form of
a Cape that can be placed on a BeagleBone Black. This page is about
the Major revision B. It has five high power and low noise stepper
motors with cool running MosFets and it has been designed to fit in
small spaces without active cooling and without the need for physical
access to the board once installed. That means no potentiometers to
trim or switches to flip.”

NERP is not exclusively Raspberry Pi, the small computer and embedded systems interest group at Pumping Station:One in Chicago. NERP meets every other Monday at 7pm at Pumping Station:One, 3519 N. Elston Ave. in Chicago. Find NERP and Pumping Station:One at
http:// www.meetup.com/NERP-Not-Exclusively-Raspberry-Pi/
and
http://pumpingstationone.org/
Doors open at 6:30pm. NERP is free and open to the public. Ed Bennett ed @ kinetics and electronics com Tags: electronics, embedded, NERP, Open Source, raspberry pi, hackerspace, Beagle Bone, Pumping Station One

by edbennett at March 27, 2017 11:54 PM

March 26, 2017

NYC Resistor

Laser cut Fractal Puzzle

Team effort

THe Gosper Curve is a self-similar fractal that can be turned into a visually interesting, yet very difficult puzzle on the laser cutter. With all of the pieces the same color it is nearly impossible, but a bi-color version is a doable challenge. You can move the slices (in blue in the SVG file) around to vary the puzzle or change the difficulty; the current version has lots of very similar pieces to make it full of “garden paths” that require frequent back-tracking when the solution almost works.

Laser cutting Gosper curves
More details are posted on trmm.net/Fractal_Puzzle and the design files are thing:2204078 on thingiverse.

by hudson at March 26, 2017 03:05 AM

March 24, 2017

Swindon Makerspace

Making an OpenLog Serial Logger from Spare Parts

Part of our makerspace access system involves an Arduino and an ESP8266. Mostly it works just fine, but every now and again the Arudino seems to lock up and stop working. Various attempts have been made to stop this happening, but so far to no avail. Leaving a laptop connected to the Arduino’s serial port for debugging wasn’t happening because it happens quite infrequently and no-one had a spare laptop to leave lying around.

Enter the OpenLog! You can buy OpenLog boards for just over £10 (less if you are willing to pay the China-wait-for-delivery-tarrif) but where’s the fun in that? I remembered that I had an SD card reader breakout board languishing unused in a drawer (it came with my 3d printer kit and I’ve never gotten round to fitting it). And who doesn’t have some random Arduino boards lying around? It should be simple to make one right? right?

Nothing is ever quite so simple….

The Hardware

My first thought was that I’d need a 3.3V Arduino, because SD cards all run on 3.3V. Of course the Pro-Minis that I had were 5V; curses! Okay so I’ll need a level shifter as well but at least I have those. But wait! This SD card reader module is designed to connect to a RAMPS board that’s on an Arduino Mega and those things run at 5V…. On closer inspection the SD card reader module has a 74hc4050d IC on board, a quick bit of googling reveals that is a level shifter. Good, so I can use the 5V Pro Mini I have and the SD card reader module, but no need for another little board with a level shifter on.

IC1 is the level-shifter

Next problem, none of the pins on the SD card reader module are labelled! I could check the RAMPS pinout, but that’s somewhat confusing because the connector on the RAMPS has 8 pins and my module has 12. After a lot of scrolling through Google images I finally found one that looks to be the same and has the pinout at this link, so it’s an HCMODU0044.

Time to do some spaghetti wiring. Connect GND and 5V to, er, GND and 5V on the Pro Mini. Connect up SCK, SO and SI from the card reader to SCK (pin 13), MISO (pin 12) and MOSI (pin 11) on the Pro Mini. CS, what to do with that? Reading the main OpenLog sketch from their github repo, there is a handy define that SD_CHIP_SELECT is pin 10. That’s probably CS then, makes sense using pins 10-13.

Finally take a random LED and 22ohm resistor from the makerspace electronic parts stock and connect it to the other GND and pin 5.  This will be the status LED.

The Software

My plan here was to download the code from github and flash it.  Job done.  Nope, too simple!  It seems that the latest code (at the time of writing) doesn’t actually build.  Eventually I stumbled across this page which, as well being a good overview of using OpenLog, also contains a button to “Download OpenLog Firmware Bundle” about half way down the page.

This code compiled “better” than the latest from github, but still failed.  Downloading the latest Serial Port library, as directed on the OpenLog page and I finally had a version of the code that would compile.  This was using Arduino 1.6.8, the OpenLog page indicated they were using 1.6.5, so I suspect some incompatibilities have been introduced somewhere along the way.

Testing the OpenLog board using an FTDI lead and the Arudino serial console resulted in the text I typed ending up in a file on the SD card! Hurrah!

Final Thoughts

It had taken me maybe an hour to wire up and program, but that was after a couple of failed starts and a fair bit of rummaging around on the internet beforehand.  It seems like a useful debugging tool to have in your box of tricks, I’m not sure why I’ve never bought or put one together before.  It would be nice to build it onto a little PCB to tidy up the wiring, but that’s a project for another day….

Has it helped to fix the problem with the makerspace access control system?  We don’t know yet….

The post Making an OpenLog Serial Logger from Spare Parts appeared first on Swindon Makerspace.

by RobertCL at March 24, 2017 08:38 PM

March 22, 2017

NYC Resistor

The 8th Annual Interactive Show: Call For Projects

It’s that time of year again. Spring is supposedly in the air and it’s time for another Interactive Show! This year’s theme is The Running Man. The 80’s dystopian future sci-fi takes place in 2017 and has so many great campy elements. Who can resist lo-fi graphics, spandex costumes, hexagonal decode systems, and a villain in LED studded armor? The projects practically create themselves! Elements from similar 80’s dystopia flicks like Max Headroom are also a great idea.

So save the date for May 13th and drop us a line to submit your projects! Projects don’t necessarily have to be on theme, just something you want to show off at a party.

therunningmanposter-cropped

runningmanintro

runningmanbakersfield

runningmanperimeter

runningmanhexagon

runningmandynamo

runningmanfireball

by potatono at March 22, 2017 07:39 PM

March 21, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 21 Mar 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Five topics for the week:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at March 21, 2017 10:31 PM

Hive76

Hivelord at the Barnes STEAM Fair

 

The Hivelord made an appearance at the STEAM Fair at the Barnes, in his new business friendly attire, along with Hive76 members Chris Terrell and Mike Barretta! In case you didn’t know, STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics, ie all the good stuff. Mike was there to entice visitors into the STEAM lifestyle with his custom portable gaming machines based on the Raspberry Pi and emulationstation, while the Hivelord took photos of unwitting participants using his face, and thus stealing a tiny portion of their soul (as it is told in The Legends). Click the link below to see the photos from the Barnes!

-> Click here to see the Hivelord’s Photos from this event! <-

 

by pete at March 21, 2017 07:47 PM

Hackspace Manchester

Bolts and other fixings in Fusion 360

I have been playing about with Fusion 360, one of thrings you will need to include before very long is a fixing, even if you can 3D print everything in your design at some point you will want to stick two parts together at which point you will need a bolt or a screw. 

This took me a while to find in Fusion 360 as it is not a work flow that instantly jumped out as how it would work. I also for a fair while thought about drawing my own bolts, but I reasoned that someone else must have done the drawings first. 

by Skippy at March 21, 2017 08:05 AM

March 20, 2017

Hackspace Manchester

How I make a Screencast

I have been playing with Fusion 360 again… and as part of that I have been finding cunning tricks that I am thankful that I now know. Since I think I have a blog or something, I shall share those I find to be useful.

And for this I shall use the medium of interpretive dance Screencast.

I found a useful tool called ScreencastMaker (Mac Appstore) that does the capture part, the glue is then Keynotes, and iMovie:

by Skippy at March 20, 2017 11:32 AM

March 16, 2017

CrashSpace

Culver City Police Deparment Community Forum on Immigration Enforcement: Watch Online

We attended this event as a part of the Civic Engagement Survival Guide: a series of free talks and workshops focused on creating a community that is informed, organized, and engaged.

Chief Brixby of the Culver City Police Department held a community forum tonight and spoke on CCPD’s role in immigration enforcement. Chief Brixby takes the time to answer community questions, and addresses the “ACLU’s 9 “Model” State and Local Law Enforcement Policies and Rules.”

“I hear you saying that immigration law enforcement is not the primary, secondary, or tertiary function of the Culver City Police Department.
I hear you saying that sanctuary status, from what you understand […] would not prevent the CCPD from enforcing the law here in Culver City.
I hear you saying that you are already in compliance with the ACLU 9 Model Principles. Is that correct?”
– An audience member

“That is correct.” – Culver City Police Chief Bixby

For more local Culver City events on the Culver City Community Calendar. Watch past videos or view upcoming events on the Civic Engagement Survival Guide.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at March 16, 2017 04:05 AM

March 14, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: 14 Mar 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Here’s 5 topics to think about today:

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at March 14, 2017 06:53 PM

Pumping Station: One

“Digit” Sensors

Knitted Finger Sensor from Jesse Seay on Vimeo.

I machine-knit these finger sleeves from a conductive yarn that changes resistance as the knit is stretched.

With this project, I wanted to design a glove that could be machine-knit for workshops cheaply and quickly, making a wearable bend sensor available to people with no textile skills.

With a range of sleeve sizes, users can select the sleeve with the best fit and resistance range for each digit. We attach flexible silicone wires by means of a snap press, and the wearer then sews the wire in place with a tapestry needle and yarn — very easy!  Once the sleeve is finished, the user can use the tapestry needle to easily sew the wire leads in place along a fingerless glove.

Get your own “digit” sensor at the PS:One workshop on March 25. Details and RSVP on Meetup.  (Workshop fee: $10.)

Jenna Boyles, Kyle Werle, and Christine Shallenberg beta-tested the sensors at Pumping Station: One. They selected sleeves for fit, then stitched on the wires themselves. Kyle and Christine were able to use the sensors to control an analog synth and a processing sketch.

More details here.

by jesseseay at March 14, 2017 02:57 AM

March 10, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Coloring Book Adventure

I am making a coloring book.  The way is fraught with fears, doubts, and time eating mechanical failuresFears of being unable to make my goals.  Doubt that my art is worth the investment of strangers.  Battles with an old scanner not being compatible with my computer.  Then a crashed computer bios that corrupted my RAID drive.  I lost a lot of files.  But I am winning.  I am winning thanks to very good friends who encouraged my talents.  I am winning with the support of my very wonderful family that helped me in times of need. I am winning because of my tenacity in the face of problems.  It is only a matter of time in this book battle of attrition.  “Today I Draw Dragons” will be a thing.

I will encourage you too to tread the path of book making.  Be not daunted by the endless tasks before you.

This project began when I started to draw dragons before work and then after work.  I began to count them.  I told myself that when I made thirty five of them I would pursue making them into a coloring book. I ended up making one hundred and fourteen of them.

I shopped around for publishers.  It is a sea of frustration.  You have your easiest ride if you can wrestle the support of a professional publishing company, but they will have a say in your product and it is hard to convince them that you are worth it.  So I decided to pursue self publishing, at least for now.  If I prove myself with a successful project, then I will show them what I can do.

None of this is the way to wealth but it is the way of artists.

Knittin’ Kitten

I learned many things.  I learned that even if I print only 30 dragon images it will be considered a 60 pages plus book to a printer even if I don’t print on both sides of the sheet of paper.  If you have a place to store 1000 books and the cash to buy and ship them then you might be able to get them printed for a competitive price.  ISBN numbers are expensive if you buy just one.

Advertising matters.  My Kickstarter shows a definite lull in support when my computer crashed and I could not reason out how to advertise without my scanned and worked drawings.  My friends and family took up the slack then.  I continued.  I made business cards and flyers to paint the town.  I wish I had done more.  But I am still winning.

Cleaning up and re-working scans for print TWICE is annoying.

I have an external hard drive now so I can back up the back ups.

planned cover image

Learning all the programs for formatting everything for print is a huge pain in my pinky toe.

I still have many tasks ahead.  I need to subscribe to a download service so that I can deliver my PDF. files.  I need to secure a high quality printer for the prints I have sold.  I need to prepare to wrap and mail out my books.  I need to make all the custom sketch cards and commissioned art sold to fund this endeavor.  I will need a plan in place to sell the extra copies I am going to order.  And I need to draw more, lots more.

This will not be my last publishing adventure, by far.

There are still a few more days if you want a copy of the book yourself:

“Today I Draw Dragons” By Shelly Loke

My Kickstarter Ends March 8th, but that is really just barely the beginning.  I hope to see your adventuresome projects up here too, soon.

Dragon Making Toast in the Style of the Ancients

 

by flyingoctopus at March 10, 2017 02:20 AM

March 08, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: March 7 2017

Weekly Round Up

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at March 08, 2017 01:02 AM

March 02, 2017

CrashSpace

SCALE 15x This Weekend in Pasadena

The Southern California Linux Expo returns for its crystal (time crystal?) anniversary this year. This will be year two in the Pasadena Convention Center, a 0.4 mi walk from the Gold Line.

Four days, a game night, HAM testing… it’s a huge value and covers many topics relevant to not just Linux in particular, but open source in general, including a legal issues track.

I’m particularly looking forward to Saturday’s keynote by Christine Corbett Moran.

The SCALE team  is very pleased to announce our second keynote speaker – Christine Corbett Moran – for Saturday, March 4, as she presents “Open Source Software as Activism“. Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow at Caltech, Open Source and mobile app developer and NASA finalist are but a few of the achievements Dr. Corbett Moran brings to the party. Please join us on Saturday as she kicks off a full day of amazing sessions.

Hope to see you there!

by carlyn at March 02, 2017 04:58 PM

March 01, 2017

Pumping Station: One

Drossel von Flügel Cosplay Project

After months of work, hours of troubleshooting 3D printers and lasers, as well as a lot of patience, I’m proud to present my completed cosplay mask of gynoid Drossel von Flügel. My friend Jaina helped me take pictures at Katsucon last weekend in National Harbor. (Yes, the same convention center, unfortunately)

Note: almost all images can be clicked for full size.

Skylar at Katsucon dressed as Drossel with a hoodie that says

Skylar at Katsucon dressed as Drossel with a hoodie that says

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ByNEET's 3D model of Drossel Sky's picture of her Drossel Figma


A picture of the Drossel mask with the Drossel Figma next to it for reference I HEART HUMANS sweater with blue heart


I have received no shortage of help from various people. The CNC department at Pumping Station: One has been great at supporting those who want to make things. Twitter user @ByNEET released a full model of Drossel which my friend Faraday (she does 3D work! fortunafaradaze at gmail dot com) helped disassemble for conversion into 3d print friendly STL files. My friends who spent countless late nights with me while I worked on this project. My mom, who was very helpful in assembling the mounts to hold it on my head at the last minute. My friend Amir, who introduced me to Pumping Station: One which has made a huge impact on me. Lastly, the PS:One community itself, for maintaining such a wonderful place to create and share as a community.

Below the read-more is a fairly detailed explanation on how I created the mask and what tools I used for those who are interested in pursing similar projects. Feel free to contact me (Skylar) with questions at SKY at TUNA dot SH or find me at the space! I also have a (photography) website, http://hexbee.net.

Click the read more below!

A little backstory:

Before I joined PS:One, I often went to conventions to take photography of cosplayers. It was always interesting to see all the different methods people used to create cosplays, from simple costumes to full on exoskeleton suits of armor. I had always wanted to cosplay, but a lack of time and the daunting prospect of being on display caused the idea to be put on the back-burner.

Of course, until I found Pumping Station: One.

The first day I stepped into the space, I saw the potential to create many cool things. On the top of my priority list? COSPLAY. The idea to cosplay Drossel stemmed largely from my interest in robots and science fiction.


About Drossel:

Drossel herself is from an obscure series of shorts produced by Disney Japan. She’s a gynoid in a future where it’s implied she is the last of her kind in a war against humanity, a war she has forgotten the reasoning behind (or just doesn’t care). Despite being 4000 years old, she’s pretty quirky and just wants to get along with humans. Of course, for the sake of the shorts, this results in antics. Interestingly, despite the show being made in Japan, Drossel’s name and model implies she is of German origins. I plan to add the correct German decals with vinyl in a future version of the cosplay.


Now for the actual information on the cosplay:

This cosplay was made with many tools and from many materials. There have actually been 4 versions of the mask created since I started working on this project.

  • Version 1 was made of thermoformed acrylic shaped on a wooden laser cut base.
  • Version 2 was 3D printed in ABS and turned out decently despite having trouble with printing consistency. I planned to smooth it using Bondo, but applied way too much to the mask. Sanding it down proved to be very difficult. I may use this version for decorative purposes in the future due to its weight.
  • Version 3 was 3D printed in PLA and turned out much smoother and consistent than the ABS. The mask from this version was actually damaged when attempting to fiberglass it. In retrospect, the attempt at fiberglass was unnecessary. Try, try again.
  • Version 4 was an attempt to print another PLA based mask, but some of the parts got damaged when gluing them together. Aligning the parts is quite difficult since there isn’t a good place to clamp them together.
  • Version 3.5 was the actual final mask in this post. I actually went into my garage on a very cold day, and in a last ditch effort to finish this, I actually just ripped the fiberglass off version 3. And to my surprise (although it really wasn’t applied properly) the fiberglass came off cleanly. Aside from some uneven fiberglass resin on the edges, the mask was basically intact.

The hoodie and other elements:

The hoodie was made using heat transfer film with the vinyl cutter and the heat press. Under the mask I wore a MorphSuit black mask so that I could see out but nobody could see in. Decent visibility indoors and in daylight. However, it had pretty bad visibility outside at night. I also used white silk opera gloves for the hands. There were supposed to be black finger-less tactical gloves over that to add to the effect, but I was unable to find them before I left. Still hunting for them!


Tools, materials and software used in Version 3.5:

  • Tools
    • LulzBot Taz3 3D printer with 0.5mm extruder
    • Epilog Engraving Laser
    • Circular sander
    • Soldering iron
    • Volt meter
    • Hot glue gun
    • Caulk gun
    • Popsicle sticks (for mixing)
    • Mixing cups
    • Cotton swabs (for cleaning misapplications)
    • Clamps (lots of clamps (can’t get enough))
  • Materials
    • 3MM white PLA (Inland brand)
    • Clear cast acrylic sheeting (1/4th inch) (from Inventables)
    • Solder
    • Hot glue
    • Black silicone (should be adhesive, I accidentally purchased flexible silicone, will touch on that later)
    • Superglue (regular super glue)
    • Two part epoxy
    • Bondo All-Purpose Putty
    • “XTC-3D”  3D part smoother epoxy (fancy epoxy really, but it works)
    • Krylon White Semi-Gloss Dual Paint & Primer
    • Krylon High-Gloss UV-Resistant Clear Coating
    • DAP Dynaflex 230 10.1 oz. Premium Indoor/Outdoor Sealant (INCORRECT PRODUCT TO USE!)
    • Hot glue (a lot of hot glue)
    • IKEA DIODER flexible strip with controller
    • “AA” battery holders
    • 8 “AA” batteries
    • Heat-shrink tubing
    • High-Density Foam Tape for insulating doors
    • Whiteout
  • Software
    • Repiter-Host (for the Taz3)
    • Slic3r
    • Metasequoia 3D
    • Maya
    • Netfabb
    • Illustrator

A general walkthrough in creating the mask:

The mask started with discovering a 3D model that @ByNEET  had created and released. The model was basically a replica of the 3D model in the show. It was originally created in Metasequoia, so I had to download a trial and convert the file to .OBJ for increased compatibility. From here, my friend Faraday (whose contact info is above in the post) disassembled the face plate and forehead from the model for conversion to STL. I used Slic3r to scale the parts up and Netfabb to clean and then break them into smaller chunks for 3d printing. Unfortunately we didn’t have any printers large enough to do one big print.

Drossel mask in Slic3rDrossel mask in NetfabbDrossel mask in repetier


Once I had files I could actually feed to the slicing software, I used Repiter-Host with Slic3r to actually slice the files into g-code from the printer. After some trial and error, I got 6 excellent quality PLA pieces that needed to be assembled. It probably took over 20 hours to print all 6 pieces over a week of nightly printing. I ended up printing the PLA at 200C with a 0.28mm layer thickness. At higher temps I frequently had over-extrusion issues on the Taz. As I mentioned earlier, I went with PLA because it produced more consistent results with considerably less warping and virtually no over-extrusion affecting the smoothness of the layers.

I aligned and glued the pieces together with super glue (very carefully) and let them dry overnight. I then filled any excess spacing with epoxy. The superglue was just to get everything set in place, and the epoxy was to help make a lasting and slightly flexible bond to support the superglue. The final assembled 3D prints had very minimal unevenness. I took the mask home and started applying Bondo to it very lightly to help smooth the mask further. I originally chose Bondo because it was not too difficult to work with, but in the future I’m going to see if I can get away with using XTC-3D exclusively, because the Bondo risks making an uneven surface, even if it is completely flat. It’s much easier to work with XTC-3D due to its lower viscosity, although there may be other epoxies that work just as well.

At this point, since this is version 3, I attempted to fiberglass it. I’m going to jump over this part since it didn’t turn out as expected. I may revisit the idea for other props in the future, but for this specific application it was inappropriate. I suppose you don’t need fiberglass if the print itself ends up being the base.

After ripping the fibreglass off, I picked the mask up again as version 3.5. I sanded some of the fiberglass resin off and took it back to PS:One where I cleaned it up and applied XTC-3D epoxy for smoothing 3D prints. Its really just a fancy epoxy, but it does a good job of smoothing and is fairly priced.

By the way, ALWAYS use gloves when dealing with epoxy, and use a smock, or clothes you don’t like. I learned this the moderately hard way. I am determined to not learn it again. Also, use a fine filter mask when sanding down epoxy. You really don’t want to breathe it in.

Drossel mask being prepped for XTC-3D application Drossel mask after initial XTC-3D application, shiny Drossel mask after initial XTC-3D application, sanded down


I applied 3 layers of XTC-3D in an attempt to smooth out defects and resin. It ended up coming out fairly nice all things considered. I sanded it a bit more and prepped it for spray painting.

To spray-paint it, I used a couple layers of “Krylon White Semi-Gloss Dual Paint & Primer” and then clear coated it with two layers of “Krylon High-Gloss UV-Resistant Clear Coating“. The paint plus primer was a faster alternative to priming and painting individually, since the surface underneath was already mostly neutral colors. With a protective high gloss clear coat added, I was able to achieve the level of gloss I wanted. Note: I wore a protective mask during this process, along with gloves. Safety first!

Drossel mask before painting, area prepped with garbage bag Drossel mask after painting with the dual paint/primer, decently shiny, very white Drossel mask after clear coating, very shiny, very white


After successfully painting it, I took measurements to cut the eyes out on the laser. I estimated the size of the acrylic I’d need by taking measurements and the narrowest and widest sections of the eyes. It wasn’t the most accurate measurement method, but it did achieve the desired results. I used multiple layers of acrylic that was held together by epoxy in order to create the lights. It improved visibility by preventing light leakage in the direction of my face and into the mask itself. I then sealed the acrylic into the mask itself with a lot of black silicone (originally intended to block light AND act as an adhesive) and a lot of hot glue (to support the flexible silicone). During this process I also took the time to adhere fabric clips with epoxy. These would be used to attach the mask to the straps holding it to my head.

testing the eye sizing with woodSealing the eye cutouts with epoxy

Sealing the acrylic eyes in with silicone Drossel Mask Support Structure, multiple straps to hold it against the head


The LED flexible strip was simply wrapped around both lenses and came out looking pretty good! I then assembled the two halves using door insulation strips, fabric, fabric tape, and a staple gun. I hacked it together under a time constraint with my mom (who, thank goodness, is a professional in the world of sewing) and all things considered we got the mask to securely hold together. The mask was held to my head by 5 interconnected straps, four of which attached to the contact points on four sides of the mask. The fifth attached to the forehead piece with staples. It made it pretty easy to put on and take off. The only addition to the mask was a 4 inch thick block of foam inside of the forehead to raise the mask up on my face, and to add some foam for the bridge of my nose. These were attached with hot glue.

Side note: The mask was originally supposed to use two way acrylic mirrors in the eyes, but lacking the time to test, I ended up going with the MorphSuit mask to hide my eyes instead. It worked pretty effectively, but I plan to test the two way mirrored acrylic soon!

Drossel mask with completed LEDs lit up blue Drossel mask as one piece with LEDs off Drossel mask as one piece with LEDs on

One complete robot mask! I used whiteout to touch up some damage the mask incurred while being moved. It fit on my head quite snugly. In fact, too snug. I found out that I couldn’t breathe in it when I got to the con! I plan to add some sort of air cooling and/or liquid cooling to the mask so that I don’t die of heat stroke, and the lenses don’t fog up. I was able to do limited photo shoots in it, but it’s rather unbearable with the hoodie.


Now for the electronics: 

Soldering the battery packs together  Testing the battery pack Testing the battery pack one more time


The IKEA DIODER strip required 12V, and due to time constraints, I simply wired up a AA battery pack to provide about 12V, two sets of four batteries in parallel. I simply carried it in my backpack. I hope to redesign this to use rechargeable cells that can last a significant amount of time, although I haven’t had to replace the batteries in this yet. Eventually I would like to replace this with an Arduino powered flexible LED strip with much cleaner wiring. I’d also probably add some glove buttons so that I could change the colors on demand from either red, to rainbow, or others.


In summary:

This was my first major project at PS:One and despite the many setbacks I came across, I persevered and completed it! However, the project isn’t truly over, as I’d like to not only create a cleaner version of the mask with everything I’ve learned, but I’d like to make the entire suit. It’s quite a daunting task, but I’m learning Fusion 360 and hope to have a pretty decent draft soon.

I hope this guide inspires and benefits anyone else looking to make stuff at PS:One! I had a lot of fun making this and I’ll be displaying it at the member meeting tonight (2/28).

I will also be attending Maker Faire in April with the mask on display!

Once again, feel free to reach out with my contact info if you have any questions, or you have your own project and are looking for some input. I’d be happy to offer whatever advice I can.

 

by skynaya at March 01, 2017 01:54 AM

February 28, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: Feb 28 2017

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Confessional:  Flu season makes you stupid. So does panic. So does the drive “not to be annoying.” It’s tax season and someone told me they should email them some financial information. I died a little and then said, “No, I can bring it by.” But I feel like I of all people should of have a better solution for that at the ready.  This person is not the most tech savvy, so even tossing a password onto the file seems like too much.  Hmmm.

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Learn

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Whew. Once again facing two weeks of news, here’s a handful.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at February 28, 2017 10:51 PM

February 27, 2017

NYC Resistor

ShopBot Furniture Making by a Woodwork Dilletante

Recently, I moved to a new apartment, and this presented me with a problem. You see, some years ago, my wife and I bought a nightstand when we had space for just one of them. Now, we have space for two, so we needed a second one. Of course, that nightstand has been discontinued for years and years. We could have purchased two new nightstands, but that seemed like a waste. Fortunately, we have a ShopBot and a supply of plywood – so I took it as a challenge to make a nightstand that was as close to the original as possible.

A nightstand that is now discontinued.

The original nightstand, made by a retailer popular with recent college graduates, that isn’t Ikea.

There were some design requirements from the outset:

  • The finished piece has to look very close to the original.
  • The finished piece must not have rough edges or visible joinery, just as the original doesn’t. My own tolerance for plywood furniture where the edges of the wood are visible is quite high, but my wife’s isn’t.
  • The finished piece should hold up as a daily-use piece; it should be solidly built.

I started out by taking dimensions from the original and then modeling it in Fusion 360:

I started out with just the faces, without any joinery. Next, I added in tab-and-slot joints, with idealized corners–that is to say I didn’t include the fillets that let the tabs actually fit together. Adding the tabs is kind of a tedious, manual process, but the best way I’ve found to add them all in is detailed in this YouTube video.

Tabs

Once I had everything laid out in Fusion 360 I exported the vectors for each part to a .DXF and exported it over to VCarve to define toolpaths. I know that Fusion has a full-featured CAM suite, but I’ve found that VCarve is slightly better suited to the ShopBot–it has everything I need and nothing that I don’t. At this stage I laid out all the parts on one sheet of 1/2″ plywood and added the fillets to all the interior corners, as well as hold-down tabs.

Then it was time to actually run the cut, which was probably the easiest part of the entire operation.

 

Once that was done, it was time to part the pieces off from the parent stock with a hammer and chisel, then sand down the flashing left over from the hold-down tabs.

Next, I dry-fit the whole thing together to make sure everything lined up the way that I expected.

 

I found a few tight spots in some of the pockets for the tabs which I had to sand down — the tabs and slots were drawn to be a precise fit, so a little bit of irregularity in the wood surface can cause a very tight fit. Once I was convinced it all fit together, I glued it all up and clamped the assembly together overnight. Unfortunately I didn’t have clamps long enough to get all the way around the parts so I had to rely on gravity to do some of the job, which ultimately resulted in a couple of gaps, though fortunately they are hard to spot. I was happy to see that the fillets on the corners the tab pockets were almost invisible as well.

That’s a bucket of sand.

 

Once the glue had fully cured overnight and the clamps were off, I set about applying edge-banding. Edge banding is a notorious pain to apply properly, and to make matters worse, I couldn’t find any locally that was close to half-inch, so I had to spend quite a bit of time with a blade, block plane, and sander to get all the edges flush. I found this video by The Wood Whisperer to be a helpful guide, since I’d never used edge veneers before.

Once I’d trimmed and sanded the veneers, it was time to move onto finishing. This was by far and away the most tedious and tricky part of the build, and the one where I made the most mistakes. I went with Minwax Polyshades in Espresso, which appeared from the samples to be about the shade I was looking for. In order to get anywhere close to the right shade (which was, frankly, still too light by the end) I needed four coats.

After the first coat, it looked like this:

The finish was really hard to control, and tended to go blotchy and drip very easily; I forged on, hoping that further coats would smooth things out. Once the first coat had cured overnight I gave it a once-over with #000 steel wool and then added another. After the second coat, the color deepened and looked like this:

After the third coat, it looked like this:

And after the fourth coat, it looked like this:

The shade was still a bit light, but the surface finish was very shiny and I thought that adding a fifth coat would turn everything into a plasticky mess so I stopped at four.

I added the drawer rails:

And then installed the drawer

And there we go! Here it is in situ. The dog was a bit mystified:

So, what did I learn – what went well, and what could have gone better?

What went well:

  • It’s absolutely possible to use the ShopBot to create professional-looking furniture – at least as far as the cutting and joinery goes. The key things here are the blind pockets for the joints and slightly proud top and base that help to hide the fillets which are often the hallmarks of CNC furniture.
  • The result is sturdy – it’s not wobbly in any axis, and the frame holds up nicely to shearing forces without bending.
  • The edge veneers look pretty decent. I could use some more practice in getting them straight, and the corners are the most obviously-dodgy bits, but I think they came out well. They’re another key to making plywood look like real wood boards.

What didn’t go so well:

  • The surface finish isn’t that terrific.
    • There are some dust particles trapped between layers of polyurethane which I should have caught. I think they might be fragments of steel wool from between coats.
    • If I was choosing a finish again I would have gone with a traditional stain and then two or three layers of polyurethane, probably in a satin or semigloss finish rather than this straight-up gloss. Having the darkness and shininess tightly bound to one another makes it very hard to get the finish right. It’s also a recipe for mess-making since everything is very thin and runs all over the place.
    • The finish, as mentioned, is a bit light – staining separately would have let me control that more precisely. I probably should also have done some test runs of the finish before applying it to the final production piece.
  • There’s more of a gap than I’d intended between the top of the drawer and the top of the table. I must have mis-measured at some stage. I should have have the ShopBot pre-drill the pilot holes for the rails. I don’t know what I was thinking.
  • Using just tab-and-slot construction and glue was probably a bit aggressive, since “no fasteners” wasn’t in the goals I set out for myself. It would probably have been fine to sneak in a few screws here and there to keep everything flush and in line, and nobody would have been any the wiser.

If you’d like to try this out yourself, I’ve made Fusion data available here.

I’m looking forward to building more furniture now that I’ve made a bunch of mistakes and can avoid them next time around. I’d also love feedback about other pitfalls! Give me a shout on Twitter or in the comments.

Guy Dickinson is a member of NYC Resistor who habitually takes things to bits and sometimes builds things too. You can follow him at @gdickinson.

by Guy Dickinson at February 27, 2017 01:30 PM

February 26, 2017

CrashSpace

Civic Hacking 101: Building Trust within a Broken System by Vyki Englert: Watch Online

This event was a part of the Civic Engagement Survival Guide: a series of free talks and workshops focused on creating a community that is informed, organized, and engaged.

Vyki Englert is a software engineer and co-founder of Compiler LA: a civic tech consultancy dedicated to building a better Los Angeles. She is also the local Brigade Captain of Los Angeles’ Code for America brigade: Hack for LA. In January, we invited her to speak at CRASH Space on her experience working in Civic Tech, as well as to provide an intro session and Q&A on what resources she knows about and how others can get involved.


Unfortunately, due to technical difficulties, the last 10 mins of the Q&A after the talk are not available online. 🙁

If you’re interested in Civic Tech, Vyki also provided us with a useful list of links to the initiatives and organizations that she mentions in her talk:

Learn more about Vyki by following her on twitter. Watch past videos or view upcoming events on the Civic Engagement Survival Guide.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at February 26, 2017 10:00 PM

February 21, 2017

NYC Resistor

Wifi Weather Display Wall Art

Matt said he wished there were more projects on the blog. Well I published a project! It’s a Wifi weather display for the coat hook area of my entryway that helps me pick outerwear and shoes. I used an Adafruit Feather Huzzah ESP8266 wifi board, seven segment display, and some NeoPixels built into a shadowbox frame. Full tutorial with code, circuit diagram, and plenty of step by step photos is on Instructables.

by Becky Stern at February 21, 2017 08:49 PM

February 20, 2017

Nottinghack

Introduction to Arduino Workshop on Saturday, 15th April

Nottingham Hackspace will be hosting an all-day Introduction to Arduino Workshop, run by James Fowkes and Ian Dickinson, on Saturday, 15th April.

The Arduino system is a microcontroller board and software designed for extreme ease-of-use and learning, and has been wildly successful all over the world – not just in electronics, but for all sorts of maker projects. If you want to learn how to incorporate electronic control into your projects, this is definitely the workshop for you.

This workshop will cover:

  • What an Arduino is, and how to program it
  • Components and tools
  • Basics of electronics (voltage, current, resistance, etc.)
  • Arduino input and outputs
  • Controlling high-power components
  • Analog output
  • And more!

Aimed for complete beginners, this workshop doesn’t require you to have written a single line of code, switched on a soldering iron or even own an Arduino to take part. All the electronics equipment, including Arduino boards, will be provided on the day, but you will need to bring a laptop to program the Arduino with. It would also help if you installed the Arduino software onto your laptop before the workshop.

This workshop will run from 11am to 4pm, with a break for lunch at 1pm, and will cost £20, which includes use of all tools, boards and components, and free tea or coffee.

Arduino Unos will be available to purchase for £18 and Arduino Starter Kits will be available to purchase for £35. Please bring cash if you would like to buy either of these.

You can purchase your tickets now at EventBrite. This is a very popular workshop, with only 15 spaces, so please buy your tickets early to avoid disappointment.

by Kate at February 20, 2017 08:00 AM

February 19, 2017

Hackspace Manchester

How to make a Twin T Notch Filter

Analogue Electronics can be hard!  If an engineer doesn't do much design or calculations all the time the skills can be lost.  I have personally probably forgotten far too much.  Helpfully there are reference materials both online and in books to help remind ourselves what we need to do!

I need to design and implement a band stop filter.  This because I need to make some circuit measurements and the 13.56 MHz signal (inherent to the circuit being measured) is swamping the input stage of a spectrum analyser.  I would like to be able to measure all the signal above 30 MHz without it being affected by out of band noise.  This is a common problem when using sensitive electronic instrumentation...what appears on screen is not always correct due to unknown out of band noise.

A Twin T Notch Filter Circuit
The go to circuit of choice in these situations is known as the Twin T Notch filter.  It's a great filter circuit that is easy to implement because of its low component count.  The websites below discuss the theory behind band stop filters and Twin T Notch filters:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Band-stop_filter

http://mysite.du.edu/~etuttle/electron/elect15.htm

http://www.radio-electronics.com/info/circuits/rc_notch_filter/twin_t_notch_filter.php

https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/alternating-current/chpt-8/band-stop-filters/

The quick way to design such a filter is to set the required parameters and then use the formula given. The parameters for my filter are:
  • Must use preferred component values
  • Must not filter signals above 30 MHz
  • Must have at least 30 dB of rejection at 13.56 MHz
The formula for calculating the component values is:

Now we can either plug some numbers into the formula above and try and get close to where we want to be or we can use an online calculator tool.  I am all for quickness and see little point in doing mathematics when I don't have to!  Here is a very useful site for calculating Notch filter component values:

http://sim.okawa-denshi.jp/en/TwinTCRtool.php

Credit should definitely be given to the engineers and Okawa-Denshi Electronics Design in Japan!

The useful thing about simulators is the component values can be selected based upon those available and not some pie in the sky value...some less helpful calculators prescribe using component values which either do not exist in the real world or require the skill of a police detective to obtain!

I also have found that when using online circuit calculators it is important to fix at least one of the component values before you start calculating things.  I entered 13.56 MHz as the centre frequency for the filter and set the value of C1 to 10 pF and C2 and C3 to 4.7 pF as these are real world (preferred) values in the E6 series.

Useful site for preferred values:

http://www.matrixtsl.com/courses/ecc/index.php?n=Capacitors.PreferredValuesCapacitors 

The online calculator did it's thing and provided the circuit below:
The Centre frequencies were:
  • Flow = 13.555950 MHz
  • FHigh = 13.679649 MHz
The frequency response of filters is often shown as a special type of graph known as a Bode plot. This is shown below:


I have no doubt that if properly constructed this circuit would provide the filter response I'm looking for - It has 40 dB of rejection at 13.56 MHz, it doesn't filter the signal for frequencies above 30 MHz but the resistor values whilst available are not values I have readily to hand.  Because of that I'm going to tweak the capacitor values and run the calculator again.

I have changed the values of C2 and C3 to 22 pF which follows the rule that C2 and C3 must be roughly double C1....Here is the circuit that the calculator came up with:
Again...this circuit would probably work but I'm still not happy with the resistor values.  They are hard to obtain.  I'm going to increase the values of the capacitors again and see what happens.  The values I have chosen are C1 = 15 pF, C2 and C3 = 82 pF
The resistor values are now much more common and available.  Lets hope the filter response is good enough.

The Centre frequencies were:
  • Flow = 13.496806 MHz
  • FHigh = 13.654780 MHz
The corresponding Bode plot:

From the numbers given and by interpreting the Bode plot this circuit meets my requirements. If I wanted I could fit a 22 pF capacitor in the C1 position and a similar result will be obtained.  That will also change the resistor values as well:

I'm liking these values the most as I am certain I have all of these components available.  I wasn't sure if I have a 15 pF capacitor. It's not a value I use much - easily obtained from any good component vendor but always best to use what you have!

The resistor values are now much more common and available.  Lets hope the filter response is good enough.

The Centre frequencies were:
  • Flow = 13.374485 MHz
  • FHigh = 13.587897 MHz
The corresponding Bode plot:

Now that we have our component values we need to calculate the power requirements.  In this case I want to be able to put as much electrical power through the filter as possible.  The signal strength of the 13.56 MHz signal in my case will be at least 20 Watts.  Therefore each component must be capable of withstanding that power level without being burnt out.

I happen to know that the 13.56 MHz signal will be coming from a signal generator and amplifier at +30 dBm.  If we convert +30 dBm into Watts we find that it is 1 Watt.  So all components need to be rated for one Watt or better. Just for fun here is the formula:

dBm = 10 * Log10 * 1 * 10^-3 (Watts)

We need to rearrange to get Watts:

10^-3 (Watts) =10^(dBm/10)) 

If we now plug the values in we get:

10^-3 (Watts) =10^(30/10))

Which is equal to 1000 * 10^-3 Watts or 1000 milli-Watts which is 1 Watt 

So all of the resistors need to be 1 Watt rated or better.  I'm going to need a small enclosure with connectors for this circuit and that means I'm probably going to need a printed circuit board.

I have used these diecast boxes in the past for this purpose - they are useful because they come with BNC connectors already fitted:
They are made by Pomona Electronics and are available from most good electronics vendors like RS components and Farnell Electronics.  My only complaint is the cost - £28.04 - yikes!

The datasheet for the box is here:

http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/63791.pdf?_ga=1.89445531.125022660.1487507564

The dimensions of the Box are below:

Rather unhelpfully the inner dimensions are not provided - I hate it when that happens. However it isn't too much of a concern, reasonable estimations can be made.

If the printed circuit board is 36 mm x 33 mm and when populated is less than 25 mm high it will fit the above box well enough.

Here is how the layout came out:

I have chosen to use surface mount components throughout and 2512 size resistors so that the power requirements are met.  The board should easily fit inside the enclosure chosen.  The dimensions shown are in mm - for those that might be interested.

Just for fun here is how the PCB will look when populated:

ISO view of the Notch Filter PCB
The top side of the Notch Filter PCB
The side view of the Notch Filter PCB
Just for fun and because I wanted to practice my 3D drawing and modelling skills I have drawn up the Pomona 3231 Box.  It is available for download at the 3D warehouse if people are interested. Here is the PCB inside the box:

Top view of the PCB in the 3231 Pomona Box

ISO view of the PCB in the 3231 Pomona Box
Finally all that is left to do on this is create a bill of materials and calculate the total cost for this Filter.  I normally buy my components from Farnell Electronics but anywhere would do.

Component Value Quantity Footprint Part Number Cost (£) Notes







Resistor 390 Ohms 5 2512 2476478 0.604 3 Watt resistor from Farnell
Resistor 27 Ohms 5 2512 2476450 0.604 3 Watt resistor from Farnell
Capacitor 82 pF 10 0603 722078 0.015 C0G from Farnell
Capacitor 22 pF 10 0805 1759489 0.0323 C0G from Farnell
PCB N/A 10 N/A N/A 14.04 10 PCBS from Elecrow
Pomona 3231 Case N/A 1 N/A 1234948 28.04 From Farnell

Unfortunately I could not get an 0805 82 pF capacitor which is annoying but I can fit an 0603 part. The total cost for the above is £43.34 - That is enough components and PCBS to make one complete unit with plenty of spares.  The cost of a single unit alone is £29.70 which I think isn't too bad.  Those pomona cases are very expensive - I might investigate a cheaper solution at some point.

The good news is all of the resistors I found are 3 Watt parts which means the filter will be able to work with high power signals!

The more astute readers may know that it is possible to buy a notch filter from various RF vendors.  I did consider these options and for those that may be interested the following websites have them on sale:



I couldn't find one that specifically sells a 13.56 MHz Band Stop Filter although I suspect such products do exist.  I doubt that I would be able to buy one for less than £30

If I do decide to make one of these I will test it and provide the results and photos.  Hopefully this was of interest to someone - Take care always - Langster!


by langster1980 at February 19, 2017 10:08 PM

Pumping Station: One

Zen Woodworking Club’s Inaugural Meeting 02/13/2016

Welcome all woodworkers and would-be woodworkers to PS:One’s woodworking club, currently meeting Mondays at 6:00 p.m. and hosted by Wood Shop Authorizer, Andy L.

Thanks to all who attended the first meeting of the Zen Woodworking Club!
Many diverse woodworking interests represented, from furniture design, to carving, to antique tool restoration to tool making. We did a little tool sharpening and cut some dovetails and only lost 2 pints of blood (total)…

Here’s a guy I once met, who’s method I loosely copy for introducing dovetails.  You can also see a lot of stuff for our equipment wish list in his shop!  ~ Andy L.

Next week 2/20/16: Tool tune up and steam bending demo!
Sharpening of chisels, planes, wits. Letter carving in wood AND Joe’s steam bending box debut

 

 

 

 

 

by adriana at February 19, 2017 09:30 PM

February 18, 2017

CrashSpace

Working Effectively with Social Justice Movements by Hannah Howard: Watch Online

This event was a part of the Civic Engagement Survival Guide: a series of free talks and workshops focused on creating a community that is informed, organized, and engaged.

In December, we met Hannah Howard, an engineer with a long history of activism. With over a decade of experience working both as the developer and the client in the non-profit space, Hannah delivers a unique and informed perspective on how technical people can best utilize their skills to assist social justice efforts. Her talk, Working Effectively with Social Justice Movements: A Primer for Techies, provides a beginner-friendly onboarding for technical people, complete with tips, tricks, and common pitfalls to avoid.

Learn more about Hannah by following her on twitter. Watch past videos or view upcoming events on the Civic Engagement Survival Guide.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at February 18, 2017 11:31 PM

Intersectionality & Allyship by Patricia Realini: Watch Online

In November, CRASH Space kicked off the Civic Engagement Survival Guide: a series of free talks and workshops focused on creating a community that is informed, organized, and engaged.

Our first speaker in the series was Patricia Realini, a software engineer and artist who engages in efforts to raise the level of public debate on issues that affect underrepresented minorities. Her talk, Intersectionality & Allyship, provides an introduction to social justice, as seen through the lens of intersectional feminism.

Learn more about Patricia by following her on twitter. Watch past videos or view upcoming events on the Civic Engagement Survival Guide.

CRASH Space is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which works to promote education through individual projects and social collaboration. CRASH Space is also a member of the EFF Electronic Frontier Alliance: a grassroots network of community and campus organizations across the United States working to educate our neighbors about the importance of digital rights.

Leading an event in this series is a paid opportunity. We are interested in events which encourage community action and education, on topics such as: civic engagement, social justice, support for marginalized groups, environmental protection, and more. Please send proposals to [info at crashspace dot org]. To support our work, you can donate here.

by alex at February 18, 2017 10:50 PM

February 17, 2017

Freeside Atlanta

A Capacitive-Touch Janko Keyboard: What I Did at the 2017 Georgia Tech Moog Hackathon

Last weekend (February 10-12, 2017) I made a Janko-layout capacitive-touch keyboard for the Moog Werkstatt at the Georgia Tech Moog Hackathon. The day after (Monday the 13th), I made this short video of the keyboard being played:

"Capacitive Touch Janko Keyboard for Moog Werkstatt"



(Text from the video doobly doo)

This is a Janko-layout touch keyboard I made at the 2017 Moog Hackathon at Georgia Tech, February 10-12. I'm playing a few classic bass and melody lines from popular and classic tunes. I only have one octave (13 notes) connected so far.

The capacitive touch sensors use MPR121 capacitive-touch chips, on breakout boards from Adafruit (Moog Hackathon sponsor Sparkfun makes a similar board for the same chip). The example code from Adafruit was modified to read four boards (using the Adafruit library and making four sensor objects and initializing each to one of the four I2C addresses is remarkably easy for anyone with moderate familiarity with C++), and code was written to send a gate (key down) signal to the Werkstatt, and to write a binary representation of the pressed key (low note priority) to an Arduino port connected to a precision R-2R ladder to generate the voltage for the VCO exponential input.

The capacitive touch sensors can be used to make a touch keyboard with any configuration, not just the Janko. With these sensors it's remarkably easy to make a functioning electronic musical keyboard, as no mechanical switches or moving parts are needed. The feeling is at least as responsive as a "real" keyboard, as response to touch and release feels instant as far as I can tell. If anything, there's a "problem" in that if you accidentally, even slightly, touch a key it will sound, whereas with a mechanical keyboard you have to "accidentally" press a key down for it to sound.

A traditional seven-natural-and-five-sharp-keys layout would have been just as easy, but less "interesting." I chose the Janko layout after having read about it for many years (see Paul Vandervoot's piano video "Demonstration of 4-Row Janko Keyboard" - he describes the layout at 4:06). The Janko has, from left to right, six whole steps per octave, thus is one less key wide per octave than the traditional keyboard, so with the same key spacings the Janko octave is a shorter distance. Going up or down diagonally is a half step, so a chromatic scale of all 12 notes is a zig-zag pattern. A major scale is the first three notes in a line (whole steps), diagonally up or down to the next key (a half step), this and the next three keys across (whole steps), and then diagonally again (a half step) to get to the octave key. You can start on any key and the major scale is the same description. This is the remarkable property of the Janko layout, there are very few patterns to memorize for the different scales and chords.

(End text from the doobly doo)


I used an Arduino Mega 2560 (actually the Inland brand compatible board from Micro Center), because I thought I would use more I/O pins than on an Uno. This project can be done on an Uno, but the direct write to the Mega DDRC and PORTC registers (and perhaps other I/O pin assignments) may need to be changed for the Uno. If you don't know how to use the AVR port registers directly, you may be better off just using a Mega 2560 rather than trying to change the code for an Uno.

No direct work for this project was done at Freeside Atlanta (nor at Georgia Tech's Invention Studio - I cut these pieces of wood to size at home using a circular saw just before going to the hackathon, then hot-glued everything together at the hackathon), but I did some preliminary work done at Freeside. I had been wanting to make some sort of Janko keyboard for a while, and in recent months I've 3d-printed a couple of rounded-rectangle "keys" to help get the feel of what I wanted. (The short time of a one-weekend build kept me from using anything other than a rectangle shape on this project, and even then I only had one octave done by 5PM Sunday.) I decided on key spacing the same as "standard" piano keys, which are about about 165mm (6.5 inches) per octave. Since the Janko layout has six (whole-step) keys per octave instead of the traditional seven (major scale) keys, this octave is about 141.4mm or 5.57 inches wide. The distance from one row of keys to the next above it is 1.8 inches, and each row up is 0.53 inches (the approximate heigth of a sharp note on a standard keyboard) higher than the previous. These numbers are mostly just "good guesses" as to what the dimensions of such a keyboard should be for good ergonomics. If you make one of these, feel free to make whatever changes you like, even a traditional key layout or something totally different.

The keys are made of brass strips. I had a brass sheet, dimensioned 6 inches by 24 inches by 0.004 inches. I cut this into rectangles of 1.5 inches by 0.75 inches. I soldered wires to one side and glued the soldered side down to a plywood board with hot glue. Each vertical pair arranged (first-and-third row, or second-and-fourth row) were connected together and connected to a sensor input on the MPR121 breakout board.

For greater versatility, each key could be connected to a separate sensor input (doubling the number of sensor inputs required). This would allow the vertical pairs to be "wired together" in software for the Janko layout, or for each key to generate a different note. This would be ideal for generating microtonal scales such as 24 notes per octave.

The current code implements a monophonic keyboard for a single voice analog synthesizer. The keyboard priority is for the lowest note played, and retriggering is off (you have to lift off all keys and press a key again to get a new gate signal). Many enhancements can be done, such as highest or last note priority, retriggering, and sending polyphonic MIDI data, and adding adding modulation wheels on the left side for pitch bend, LFO modulation amount, and other possible performance parameters (I think there should be at least three such wheels, with the third one changing the filter cutoff frequency). These are, as always, left as an exercise for the student.

Blatant Blurb for Synthesizer Class

This Tuesday, February 21 2017, I'll be putting on a class at Freeside:
"Introduion to Electronic Musical Instruments."
I'll cover analog music synthesizers, and have this Janko keyboard instrument and others in the Synth Petting Zoo after the class. There is a $10 charge, this covers the time and cost of setting up and of using Freeside to put on this class. Sign up here:
https://www.meetup.com/Freeside-Atlanta/events/236883195/

Schematic (power supply connections for Werkstatt and Arduino not shown):

Arduino code:

// tkey - read capacitive touch keys and control Werkstatt
// Ben Bradley Feb. 11-12, 2017
// for Moog Hackathon

// substantial code taken from the MPR121test program from the
// Adafruit library.


// From other keyscan program for the Mega2560:

// AVRpin AVR name   Arduino name
//   1    PG5         D4
//   2    PE0         D0
//   3    PE1         D1
//   4    PE2
//   5    PE3         D5
//   6    PE4         D2
//   7    PE5         D3
//   8    PE6
//   9    PE7
//  12-18 PH0-PH6     D17-D16,X,D6-D9
//  19-26 PB0-PB7     D52-D50,D10-D13
//  27    PH7
//  28-29 PG3-PG4
//  35-42 PL0-PL7     D49-D42                   // out to r-2r ladder
//  43-50 PD0-PD7     D21-D18,X,X,X,D38
//  51-52 PG0-PG1     D40-D41
//  53-60 PC0-PC7     D37-D30             ***  Voltage control output, port C
//  63-69 PJ0-PJ6     D15-D14,X,X,X,X,X
//  70    PG2         D39
//  71-78 PA7-PA0     D29-D22             ***
//  79    PJ7
//  82-89 PK7-PK0     A15-A8
//  90-97 PF7-PF0     A7-A0
//  98    AREF



/*********************************************************
This is a library for the MPR121 12-channel Capacitive touch sensor

Designed specifically to work with the MPR121 Breakout in the Adafruit shop
  ----> https://www.adafruit.com/products/

These sensors use I2C communicate, at least 2 pins are required
to interface

Adafruit invests time and resources providing this open source code,
please support Adafruit and open-source hardware by purchasing
products from Adafruit!

Written by Limor Fried/Ladyada for Adafruit Industries. 
BSD license, all text above must be included in any redistribution
**********************************************************/

#include <Wire.h>
#include "Adafruit_MPR121.h"

// You can have up to 4 on one i2c bus but one is enough for testing!
Adafruit_MPR121 chip1 = Adafruit_MPR121();
Adafruit_MPR121 chip2 = Adafruit_MPR121();
Adafruit_MPR121 chip3 = Adafruit_MPR121();
Adafruit_MPR121 chip4 = Adafruit_MPR121();

// Keeps track of the last pins touched
// so we know when buttons are 'released'
uint16_t lasttouched1 = 0;
uint16_t currtouched1 = 0;
uint16_t lasttouched2 = 0;
uint16_t currtouched2 = 0;
uint16_t lasttouched3 = 0;
uint16_t currtouched3 = 0;
uint16_t lasttouched4 = 0;
uint16_t currtouched4 = 0;



const int GateOut = 48;   // Mega digital output

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);

  while (!Serial) { // needed to keep leonardo/micro from starting too fast!
    delay(10);
  }
 
//  Serial.println("Adafruit MPR121 Capacitive Touch sensor test");

//   The MPR121 ADDR pin is pulled to ground and has a default I2C address of 0x5A
// You can adjust the I2C address by connecting ADDR to other pins:
// ADDR not connected: 0x5A
// ADDR tied to 3V: 0x5B
// ADDR tied to SDA: 0x5C
// ADDR tied to SCL: 0x5D

  // Default address is 0x5A, if tied to 3.3V its 0x5B
  // If tied to SDA its 0x5C and if SCL then 0x5D
  if (!chip1.begin(0x5A))
  {
    Serial.println("MPR121 chip1 not found, check wiring?");
    while (1);
  }
//  Serial.println("MPR121 chip1 found!");


  if (!chip2.begin(0x5B))
  {
    Serial.println("MPR121 chip2 not found, check wiring?");
    while (1);
  }
//  Serial.println("MPR121 chip2 found!");

  if (!chip3.begin(0x5C))
  {
    Serial.println("MPR121 chip3 not found, check wiring?");
    while (1);
  }
//  Serial.println("MPR121 chip3 found!");

  if (!chip4.begin(0x5D))
  {
    Serial.println("MPR121 chip4 not found, check wiring?");
    while (1);
  }
//  Serial.println("MPR121 chip4 found!");

  Serial.println("All chips found.");

  DDRC = 0xff;
  PORTC = 0;
  pinMode (GateOut, OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite(GateOut, 0);
} // void setup()

void loop()
{

  int notepressed = -1;
  // Get the currently touched pads
  currtouched1 = chip1.touched();
 
#ifdef __print_touched_
  for (uint8_t i=0; i<12; i++) {
   // it if *is* touched and *wasnt* touched before, alert!

    if ((currtouched1 & _BV(i)) && !(lasttouched1 & _BV(i)) )
    {
      Serial.print("c1 "); Serial.print(i); Serial.println(" touched");
    }
    // if it *was* touched and now *isnt*, alert!
    if (!(currtouched1 & _BV(i)) && (lasttouched1 & _BV(i)) )
    {
      Serial.print("c1 "); Serial.print(i); Serial.println(" released");
    }
  }
#endif #ifdef __print_touched_


  currtouched2 = chip2.touched();
#ifdef __print_touched_
  for (uint8_t i=0; i<12; i++)
  {
    // it if *is* touched and *wasnt* touched before, alert!
    if ((currtouched2 & _BV(i)) && !(lasttouched2 & _BV(i)) ) {
      Serial.print("c2 "); Serial.print(i); Serial.println(" touched");
    }
    // if it *was* touched and now *isnt*, alert!
    if (!(currtouched2 & _BV(i)) && (lasttouched2 & _BV(i)) )
    {
      Serial.print("c2 "); Serial.print(i); Serial.println(" released");
    }
  }
#endif #ifdef __print_touched_

  currtouched3 = chip3.touched();
 
#ifdef __print_touched_
  for (uint8_t i=0; i<12; i++)
  {
    // it if *is* touched and *wasnt* touched before, alert!
    if ((currtouched3 & _BV(i)) && !(lasttouched3 & _BV(i)) ) {
      Serial.print("c3 "); Serial.print(i); Serial.println(" touched");
    }
    // if it *was* touched and now *isnt*, alert!
    if (!(currtouched3 & _BV(i)) && (lasttouched3 & _BV(i)) )
    {
      Serial.print("c3 "); Serial.print(i); Serial.println(" released");
    }
  }
#endif #ifdef __print_touched_


  currtouched4 = chip4.touched();
 
  for (uint8_t i=0; i<12; i++)
  {
    // it if *is* touched and *wasnt* touched before, alert!
    if ((currtouched4 & _BV(i)) && !(lasttouched4 & _BV(i)) ) {
      Serial.print("c4 "); Serial.print(i); Serial.println(" touched");
    }
    // if it *was* touched and now *isnt*, alert!
    if (!(currtouched4 & _BV(i)) && (lasttouched4 & _BV(i)) )
    {
      Serial.print("c4 "); Serial.print(i); Serial.println(" released");
    }
  }


  if ((lasttouched1 != currtouched1) ||
      (lasttouched2 != currtouched2) ||
      (lasttouched3 != currtouched3) ||
      (lasttouched4 != currtouched4))
  {
    // find lowest note.

 
    if (currtouched1)
    {
      for (int8_t i=11; i>=0; i--)
      {
        if (currtouched1 & _BV(i))
          notepressed = i;
      }
    }
    else
    if (currtouched2)
    {
      for (int8_t i=11; i>=0; i--)
      {
        if (currtouched2 & _BV(i))
          notepressed = 12 + i;
      }
    }
    else
    if (currtouched3)
    {
      for (int8_t i=11; i>=0; i--)
      {
        if (currtouched3 & _BV(i))
          notepressed = 24 + i;
      }
    }
    else
    if (currtouched4 & 0x01)
      notepressed = 36;     // highest key
//    Serial.print("lowest note ");
    if (notepressed != -1)
    {
      PORTC = 37 - notepressed; // invert bits for negative sum
      Serial.print(notepressed);
      Serial.print (' ');
    }
    if (currtouched1 | currtouched2 | currtouched3 | currtouched4)
      digitalWrite(GateOut, 1);
   else
      digitalWrite(GateOut, 0);
  } // if ((lasttouched1 != // note changed

  // reset our state
  lasttouched1 = currtouched1;
  lasttouched2 = currtouched2;
  lasttouched3 = currtouched3;
  lasttouched4 = currtouched4;

} // void loop()

by benbradley (noreply@blogger.com) at February 17, 2017 11:41 AM

February 15, 2017

CrashSpace

Tuesday Sweep: Feb 14 2017

Reflect

What’s are the frictions keeping you from doing “what’s right”? Regret is only useful if it leads to a plan on how to improve.

Confessional:  I’ve been coughing and oozey and asleep for the last week and a half, and am hopefully coming around the corner now. I apologize for missing last week. This is the thing about routines, they can be knocked off pretty quick if something goes wrong early in the game. But we’re back now. I actually left the house today! Whee!

Continuing Set Up

We’ve covered so much so fast. You’re not behind, you’re just where you are. Pick something to do.

  • If you’re having trouble with all the set up, the coach tool at the Crash Override Network has a great step by step break down for many of the same introductory steps we did here.
  • Review the list of OneThing articles so far and pick one to catch up on.

Sweep

This list will be getting longer, but lets keep it simple while folks are still setting up.

Learn

Where do you scan for news? I keep an eye out for recent exploits and breaches that have come to light, new tools, interesting idea’s, etc.

Engage

We are a community. You are a welcome part of it.

by carlyn at February 15, 2017 12:04 AM

February 10, 2017

LVL1

Magic Mirror Builds – February 2017

Ever wanted to create a Magic Mirror? Look no further than this build session! RSVP Link Session #1: Wednesday, Feb 22, 2016 6-9PM Powered by Eventbrite Session #2: Saturday, Feb 25, 2017 10AM-1PM Powered by Eventbrite Q: What is a Magic Mirror? A: A Magic Mirror is a reference to a 2 way mirror with […]

by Daniel Johnsen at February 10, 2017 11:25 PM

NYC Resistor

Motors class on February 25

We’ve got a motors class coming up on February 25th! Make Things Move: Intro to Motor Control with Arduino is a three-hour intro to the wonderful world of motors. From RC cars, Robot Arms, or 3D printers, this class gets you started learning how to use a variety of motors. Learn about the different types of motors and make them move! This class will combine a discussion of motors best-practices as well as hands-on experience controlling them with an Arduino. Ticket price includes all the supplies you’ll need (and get to take home!).

Tickets available on Eventbrite.

by Bonnie Eisenman at February 10, 2017 05:29 PM